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Coins of England across two-thousand years

Started by UK Decimal +, May 05, 2011, 11:56:45 AM

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davidrj

A Penny, approx 1253 Henry III type 5b Nicole Canterbury



and a  Farthing 1272-1307 Edward I London


bgriff99

#16
WOW.   This is what I hoped to see on this thread.   Am I seeing the inscription of the first piece right, that R and I of HENRICUS are on top of each other?    I've always wondered why the ordinal was used on his coins for the first time (?) and then not again until Henry VII.    Was Dei Gratia not used before this?   

Do you have any from the Anarchy?

Mycoins

Nice thread- I would not mind owning a George IV sovereign, but this farthing will have to do. A nice coin wich I like a lot.

Figleaf

Quote from: bgriff99 on October 16, 2014, 09:17:17 PM
Am I seeing the inscription of the first piece right, that R and I of HENRICUS are on top of each other?

There's something weird going on there, but look at the N in ON on the other side. It's more like OI and jiddish hadn't been invented yet :) Neither spelling error is at the end of the legend, so stuff didn't get squashed together for lack of place. An illiterate die sinker, maybe?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

malj1

Quote from: Mycoins on January 18, 2015, 06:52:22 PM
Nice thread- I would not mind owning a George IV sovereign, but this farthing will have to do. A nice coin wich I like a lot.

Here is perhaps the next best thing, a gilt farthing of George IV 1827
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

davidrj

Quote from: Figleaf on January 18, 2015, 08:26:46 PM
There's something weird going on there, but look at the N in ON on the other side. It's more like OI and jiddish hadn't been invented yet :) Neither spelling error is at the end of the legend, so stuff didn't get squashed together for lack of place. An illiterate die sinker, maybe?

Peter

Sorry only just noticed this post

The N of ON is ligated to the C of CANT, as is the A and N within CANT.

Very common in medieval legends, accepted method of abbreviation at the time

malj1

Quote from: malj1 on August 07, 2011, 08:16:41 AM

Here is a nice Queen Anne farthing; not 'The' 1714 one, but a pattern from 1713.
Reverse legend; PAX MISSA PER ORBIM - 'Peace sent throughout the world'.

I recently bought another quite worn example of the pattern farthing from 1713; [J7J3]

I wonder how it came to be used so much.  ???
Malcolm
Have a look at  my tokens and my banknotes.

bhx7

Not the prettiest coin in the world. I bought it for 99p off a certain auction site as a curio. After getting it I managed to identify it, see image for details. I have since had it authenticated and it has been valued at considerably more. At present only 6 are known. A nice little piece of our British History.

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

brandm24

Very nice pickup and addition to your collection. Sometimes nice things are found in places you least expect to see them. As far as condition goes. At that rarity level it's of minor importance.

Bruce
Always Faithful

Tirant

Very interesting post! Here's one of my favorite british coins, the George V's 25 years of reign crown:


bhx7

So 2 more that give a little more insight into our British heritage. This time 2 Roman coins minted in London, Mint Marks PLN and PLON.

Figleaf

An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

ttkooau

A recent purchase at the LCS,
1911 Maundy two-pence
and happy new year 2024
The ox moves slowly, but the Earth is patient

ttkooau

And a previous auction pick up,
a sadly cleaned-to-death 1729 maundy two-pence
The ox moves slowly, but the Earth is patient