Dams and hydroelectric power plants

Started by <k>, March 12, 2011, 05:06:26 PM

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<k>

Sri Lanka 2 rupees 1981.jpg

Sri Lanka, 2 rupees, 1981.  The Mahaweli Dam.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#1
Paraguay 50 guaranies 1995.JPG

Paraguay, 50 guaranies, 1995.  Acaray River Dam.
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bart

Here are 2 Egyptian coins: the first a 50 piastres, issued for "the Diversion of the Nile". This was one of a series (10,25 and 50 piastres). The second one was issued with subjest: Aswan Dam Power plant.

Figleaf

#3
The dating of these piece is not a coincidence. With decolonization after the second world war, the question arose of how to develop developing countries. Tinbergen proposed to concentrate on infrastructure, inferring that other sectors would take care of themselves with the money spent on infrastructure and using a good infrastructure. In this model, dams were very powerful tools: they generated electricity and provided a water reserve. Through the influence of his pupil Tjalling Koopmans, this model was used by the Washington organisations: IMF and the World Bank group. The high point of this period may be the Aswan dam in Egypt: a politically inspired giant.

By the 1990s, the model was attacked, especially by the Green movement. Consensus moved away from infrastructure and towards good governance. The low point of the change in attitude is symbolised by the three gorges dam in China.

Dams used to be construction projects of great national pride. Today, hydro-electric dams are considered negatively, unless they are very small. Note that the Wiki lemma on the three gorges is much more critical than the one on Aswan. I would expect that coins with dams are concentrated in the period 1960-1990.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Abhay

#4
And here's a 100 rupee note from India, with the Hirakud dam (1957) in Orissa state on the reverse.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

<k>

#5
Syria £1 1976-.JPG

Syria, 1 Pound, 1976.  Euphrates dam.
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Bimat

Sri Lanka 1000 Rupees (2012): 60 Years of Diplomatic Relations with Japan. (Collector coin)



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

SquareEarth

#7
Egypt 50 Piastre 1964 Aswan Dam




Aswan dam medal(?) 1960

Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

SquareEarth

#8
China
1996
Three Gorges Dam
50 Yuan
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

<k>

#9
Egypt 1 pound 1973.JPG

Egypt, 1 pound, 1973.  Aswan Dam.  FAO issue.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#10
Uruguay N$100 1981.jpg

Uruguay, 100 nuevos pesos, 1981. 

The binational hydroelectric dam at Salto Grande, serving Uruguay and Argentina.
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<k>

#11
Ukraine 2 hryvnia 2009.jpg


Ukraine, 2 hryvnia, 2009. 

Zaporizhzhia Oblast. 

Obverse: Zaporizhzhia Arms.  Reverse: River Dnieper and Dniporhes Dam.
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Figleaf

The worried look on the face of the gunner is priceless :) Maybe because the gun is or looks to be a ship's (12 pounder?) cannon, not a landlubber pea popper.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Gusev

Nepal, 5 Paisa, 1974 AD
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.

Gusev

Austria, 5 euro, 2003.
Kraftwerk Glockner-Kaprun and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn, 3293 m.
"Those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there."- Marcus Washling.