Author Topic: Protecting museum coins  (Read 2763 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 415
Protecting museum coins
« on: November 14, 2010, 09:31:51 AM »
CCTV cameras yet to be installed at city museum
AMC had promised to install cameras at Amdavad no Atit following the theft of a rare 1748 gold coin

Zahid Qureshi and Ruturaj Jadav, November 14, 2010

Amdavad no Atit museum from where the 10.5 gm gold coin of Emperor Mohammed Shah’s era was stolen in broad day light Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation has failed to install CCTV cameras at Amdavad no Atit, after a rare 1748 gold coin, belonging to Mughal Emperor Mohammed Shah’s era, was stolen in a broad day light in June. 

The AMC authorities had promised to strengthen the security at the museum. Though the number of security guards have increased at the museum, the CCTVs are yet to be installed.

The security-strengthening plan was to keep a watch at every nook and corner of the museum.

Deputy Municipal Commissioner S K Langha said, “The places for installation of CCTVs have been earmarked, and the cameras will be functional within 15 days.”

A total of six cameras will be put up at the museum and will be controlled from the museum superintendent’s office. Langha said, “The cameras will be of high definition and the data of 15 days will be stored.” 

The Amdavad no Atit museum houses rare coins, paintings, artifacts, photographs, news clipping and paintings that serve as a reminder of a bygone era.

Following the coin stolen in broad day light from the museum, AMC had filed a complaint at Ellisbridge police station in this connection.

However, police have not been able to find any lead in this case till date. J B Gadhavi, senior PI of Ellisbridge police station, said, “The investigation is on and we are trying to trace the culprits on the basis of statements taken from the museum officials.”

About the coin

The stolen coin was around 250 years old, and was released during Mughal Emperor Mohammed Shah’s reign in 1748. The gold coin weighed around 10.5 gms.

Source: Ahmedabad Mirror
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Abhay

  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 755
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2010, 11:07:42 AM »
Though it is really sad that the Mohur was stolen from the museum, but Muhammad Shah Mohurs are not very rare and expensive, and can be relplaced easily.

The mohur in my collection is shown here.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Offline asm

  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6 848
  • Ahmedabad, India
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2010, 11:35:42 AM »
.......... but Muhammad Shah Mohurs are not very rare and expensive,.......

Abhay

Yes, the Mohurs of Muhammad Shah and Aurangzeb are both easily available and can be easily replaced. However the question is could they trace the the stolen piece......

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 415
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2010, 12:47:02 PM »
Journalists are easily impressed with gold, though I must admit that mohur is a thing of beauty (and INR 17.50 is not expensive :).) I bet there are exhibits in the collection that cannot be replaced, though and they need protection. Not sure how effective cameras are. My impression is that they only help catch very stupid criminals. A piece of cloth over the lens, a ski mask, or even some clever make-up will render them ineffective.

Around here, churches protect valuable inventory with a small chip that can be hidden in the object and trigger an alarm when the object is moved. Wouldn't work for coins, but it would work for the cases they are kept in.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Abhay

  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2 755
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2010, 12:55:16 PM »
(and INR 17.50 is not expensive :).)

Peter

Dear Peter,

17.5 is INR 17500. If I remember correctly, I got this Mohur around 2 years back. At today's rate of gold (INR 20000 per 10 Grams), the value of gold in this mohur is roughly INR 21600. The mohur should cost around 24-25K. (I think that's the cheapest you can get a Mohur today).

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 613
  • Mumbai, India.
Protecting museum coins
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2010, 01:33:16 PM »
I'm sure after 10 years or so, Abhay will be having his own personal museum in Gwalior :) You have incredible collection of coins, banknotes and even stamps. :o

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Bimat

  • आदित्य
  • Global Moderator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11 613
  • Mumbai, India.
Protecting museum coins
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2010, 01:38:28 PM »
Quote
17.5 is INR 17500.
It reminds me of a funny incident that happened in last coin fair in Mumbai. A newbie was roaming around and he discovered a big dealer who was having some spectacular British India stuff. The guy found a nice BI rupee coin (or banknote, I don't remember exactly) and he asked its price. Dealer said '40'.And he happily gave a 50 rupees note to the dealer.. :D :D :D

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Austrokiwi

  • Guest
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2010, 04:24:56 PM »
Journalists are easily impressed with gold, though I must admit that mohur is a thing of beauty (and INR 17.50 is not expensive :).) I bet there are exhibits in the collection that cannot be replaced, though and they need protection. Not sure how effective cameras are. My impression is that they only help catch very stupid criminals. A piece of cloth over the lens, a ski mask, or even some clever make-up will render them ineffective.

Around here, churches protect valuable inventory with a small chip that can be hidden in the object and trigger an alarm when the object is moved. Wouldn't work for coins, but it would work for the cases they are kept in.

Peter

Sometimes museums just don´t value what they have. Even those that specialise in coins.  The Royal mint historical services advised me that a Bombay MTT MTT had been mislaid. It may not seem too important except I have found it is next to impossible to confirm the identification features currently accepted. 

Added to this a Royal mint letter of 1940 records they had a bombay mint example that had been produced by polished dies suggests there is an interesting currently unrecognised variety (proof or polished standard) and the museum that should have the requisite information either has lost it or has it buried where few can find it. I found the letter in War Office files.

Online Figleaf

  • Administrator
  • Honorary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32 415
Re: Protecting museum coins
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2010, 04:55:30 PM »
In 2000, a long negotiation and several diplomatic interventions achieved that a bar of gold was repatriated to the Netherlands. It was the only remaining gold bar with the VOC logo. It came from the ship Leimuiden, stranded on Boa Vista (Cape Verde Islands) on 25th January 1770 with 37 such bars on board. The captain abandoned ship with a select few. The crew went around plundering, made rafts and jumped overboard with whatever they had been able to put their hands on. A few drowned, as the 45 kilogram gold bars drew them to the bottom of the sea.

The unique bar was the centrepiece of a special exhibition organized by the predecessor of the Geldmuseum. The exhibition opened on 29th March 2000. On 19th April, a man smashed the case with the gold bar and simply ran out of the exhibition with the gold. The crime has not been solved. Since the bar is unique, it is almost certain that it was melted and sold as raw gold.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.