Author Topic: A Third Reich Commemorative  (Read 8590 times)

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Offline FosseWay

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Re: A Third Reich Commemorative
« Reply #30 on: January 11, 2011, 10:03:21 AM »
AFAIK there were no circulation coins for the Soviet Union with Stalin's head on them, either, and I suspect for similar reasons. Both states were not monarchies in the traditional sense, and wanted to perpetuate the convenient fiction that they were legitimate republics, where the entire lawmaking apparatus was bigger than the one man at the top. To have put Hitler or Stalin on the coins in the same way as the British put George VI or the Italians Vittorio Emanuele would have undermined this window-dressing. (I agree that having Hitler on the stamps seems a little contradictory; again, AFAIK, in the Soviet Union this didn't happen with Stalin.) I suspect Hitler might have eventually appeared on commemorative coins, such as a significant birthday of his or a significant anniversary of his rule, but these obviously never came to pass in peacetime.

Offline <k>

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Re: A Third Reich Commemorative
« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2011, 05:26:29 PM »
Both states...wanted to perpetuate the convenient fiction that they were legitimate republics, where the entire lawmaking apparatus was bigger than the one man at the top.

Given that the Nazi constitution claimed "The Fuehrer's will is law", and that Hitler regarded the state as subordinate to himself and his party, I can't agree with that. He had no problem with his portrait appearing on the stamps of Germany, Poland, and Bohemia and Moravia, so I doubt he would have had any problem if it had appeared on coins. I've read that he was simply not satisfied with the portraits prepared for coins. How true that is, I don't know.

The Soviets, even under Stalin, would definitely have wanted to be seen as legalistic and not operating a dictatorship of any form. Stalin always took the trouble to show that he believed (whether he did or not) that all his actions were in line with the tenets of Lenin. He regarded his legitimacy as coming from Lenin. Hitler recognised no such predecessor.

From memory, I believe the Czechoslovaks issued a commemorative coin portraying Stalin (was it before his death?), but I cannot think of any other country that did so.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: A Third Reich Commemorative
« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2011, 06:37:47 PM »
Whether Hitler appreciated his portrait I don't know. As I wrote, Müller-Erfurt's design won the 1941 competition. His design had to be modified as Hitler wanted some details to be changed. But the coin was never issued.

Right, Czechoslovakia had two coins (same design) featuring Stalin in 1949. They were issued to celebrate his 70th birthday, and yes, he was alive then. To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the WW2 victory, Russia issued a 100 ruble silver coin (1 kilo, diameter 10 cm) in 2005 which indirectly shows Stalin too.

Christian
« Last Edit: December 31, 2016, 09:37:59 PM by eurocoin »