King Charles III: scope of his reign; speculation about the Commonwealth Realms

Started by Big_M, September 09, 2022, 08:45:27 AM

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<k>

And now it's the turn of the Bahamas to consider the future of the monarchy:

PM: Govt will let Bahamians decide if nation should transition to a republic

PRIME Minister Phillip "Brave" Davis said on Friday that his administration will let Bahamians decide whether The Bahamas should transition into a republic amid reignited discussion over the issue following Queen Elizabeth II's death.

"I will have a referendum and the Bahamian people will have to say to me, 'yes.'"

Asked if having a referendum was on the table, the prime minister replied that it was.

"For me, it always is but again it is our people who will have to decide," he added.
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quaziright

Along with New Zealand, Canada may also be the last to go. However not because there is a deep love for the monarchy here, far from it, my impression so far is that most people are at best indifferent. The Canadian constitution makes the process of change nearly impossible as it requires unanimity among the provinces. So the smallest Province, PEI could veto any such constitutional change. I don't believe a referendum is necessary, it simply has to be passed unanimously through the parliaments of the 10 provinces. So there could be any combination of variables that could stymie the process. When it comes down to it, the question will be what is the benefit. Money wise, not much. But if the royalty turns out to consistently jump from one major embarrassment an/or scandal to another, then maybe that would be the impetus to rethink the Canada-monarchy relationship

In a nut shell, I do not see it changing in my lifetime

<k>

Quote from: quaziright on September 11, 2022, 03:38:13 PMIn a nut shell, I do not see it changing in my lifetime

When I read your opinion elsewhere that Charles has a "man of the people vibe", it occurred to me that only an 84-year-old could think that. So maybe you personally will not be around to see it.  :-\
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quaziright

Quote from: <k> on September 11, 2022, 04:30:32 PMWhen I read your opinion elsewhere that Charles has a "man of the people vibe", it occurred to me that only an 84-year-old could think that. So maybe you personally will not be around to see it.  :-\

Maybe in spirit I'm indeed 84 yrs. But yours may be more serious with them eyes giving way. My impression that Charles portraying himself as a man of the people vibe is far removed from me giving an opinion that he indeed has any such vibe.

<k>

This topic is mainly devoted to political news about the Commonwealth realms and whether or not they wish to become republics.

We are currently in a transitional period, and eventually matters will settle down.


For news on the actual numismatic portraits of Charles III, as they emerge, and speculation about them, visit andyg's topic:

Coinage portraits of King Charles III and related changes
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Pabitra


<k>

CIII monogram.webp

The monogram of King Charles III.


From the Guardian:

King Charles III's official monogram design released by palace.

The King's new monogram has been revealed as the period of royal mourning for the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, comes to an end.

Charles's cypher will appear on government buildings, state documents and on some postboxes in the coming months and years.

The cypher features the King's initial "C" intertwined with the letter "R" for Rex – Latin for king – with "III" denoting Charles III, with the crown above the letters.

The monogram is Charles's personal property and was selected by the monarch from a series of designs prepared by the College of Arms. A Scottish version features the Scottish crown, and was approved by Lord Lyon King of Arms.

It will be used by government departments and by the royal household for franking mail. The decision to replace cyphers will be at the discretion of individual organisations.

The process will be a gradual one and in some instances the cyphers of previous monarchs can still be seen on public buildings and street furniture, especially post boxes.
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Offa

Quote from: <k> on September 27, 2022, 06:45:06 PMThe process will be a gradual one and in some instances the cyphers of previous monarchs can still be seen on public buildings and street furniture, especially post boxes.


You can still see the odd post box with the VR monogram for Victoria in some parts of the UK.
All coins are equal but some are more equal than others

Alan71

Quote from: Offa on September 28, 2022, 11:17:39 AMYou can still see the odd post box with the VR monogram for Victoria in some parts of the UK.
According to BBC News:

"Almost 70,000 of the current post boxes, about 60% of the total, date from the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. There are only about 170 surviving from the short reign of Edward VIII, who abdicated in 1936."

I'm actually surprised it's only 60%.  Considering that's taken 70 years, it seems unlikely that Charles will appear on more than 20% in his (expected maximum) 25-year reign, particularly as there is much less regular post in the digital age than there used to be.


quaziright

In our recently monthly club meeting, a couple of our senior members who are well regarded in numismatic circles had no doubt Charles' portrait would appear on Canadian coinage, and it will happen sometime next year.

I think that is probably enough for me to also now expect Charles and his legendary ears to feature on coins over this side of the Atlantic

redlock

Quote from: quaziright on October 06, 2022, 09:43:29 PMIn our recently monthly club meeting, a couple of our senior members who are well regarded in numismatic circles had no doubt Charles' portrait would appear on Canadian coinage, and it will happen sometime next year.

And what about the Canadian $20 banknote? Will Charles be on it?

quaziright

On banknotes, we're still waiting on a new $5 bill. There has been a push to put more local heroes on our banknotes, so maybe the monarch will be dethroned from the only banknote in the current series. But given that our notes are polymer, it maybe a while before there is a need to bring in new notes and new designs

However with the change in laws on interchange fees between credit card providers and retail merchants, the process could speed up. Watch this space


Jonathan Ouellet

Quick question about the minting of coins for King Charles. Do the commonwealth countries need to wait on British approval to produce them?
For example could Canada or Australia have their coins minted and in circulation before the British ones are made?