New Zealand: denominations shown in Maori on collector coins

Started by <k>, July 27, 2022, 06:02:18 AM

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<k>

New Zealand $1 2012.jpg

New Zealand, $1, 2012.   N# 29223.

KOTAHI TARA.  One dollar.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

New Zealand $1 2018.jpg

New Zealand, $1, 2018.   

TAHI TARA.  Is that grammatically correct?
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Offa

I can see this happening with general circulation coins as well.
All coins are equal but some are more equal than others

Figleaf

Quote from: <k> on July 27, 2022, 06:03:39 AMTAHI TARA.  Is that grammatically correct?

FWIW, Google translate says "kotahi tara" is one dollar, "tahi tara" is some dollars.

Green half ball means "got kicked in painful place".

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on July 27, 2022, 01:45:50 PMFWIW, Google translate says "kotahi tara" is one dollar, "tahi tara" is some dollars.

So TAHI TARA is wrong in this instance.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

Not that I speak the language, but if you look "tahi" up in this Maori Dictionary, you get ...

1. (numeral) one, single, 1 - as in counting out things, in which case each number is preceded by ka.
2. (numeral) firstly, first of all - when preceded by ka.

The page also has context examples. Judging from that, I'd say kotahi – or ka tahi? – tāra is right. Of course figures (e.g. "1 dollar") would help, but ... ::)

<k>

Banknote_(AM_608507-5).jpg

The 1890s "Bank of Aotearoa" 1 pound/Kotahi pauna note.

Former forum member TranslateLtd alerted me to this. He tells me:

There are very few extant examples from the BoA, along with some cheque forms.  It's doubtful they ever circulated or that the bank even existed, and as I recall the best theory is that they were samples presented to Maori King Tawhiao (the fellow who featured on our 1934-40 series banknotes) in case such an entity were to be set up.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.