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Coins that are on your wishlist... but probably will never be on your collection

Started by Tirant, February 03, 2022, 03:04:59 PM

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Tirant

Hi people,

All we know that collecting coins (as well as tokens, banknotes, stamps, etc. ) is a hobby with a very wide range of stuff. There are cheap items, affordable for most collectors, and exclusive jewels that we'll only see in museums or rich people's private collections. Let's talk about these last ones. Because dreaming is fun (and free, at least by now) let's talk about those coins / tokens / banknotes / or whatever you collect that you'd love to have in your collections, but for one reason or another, they will probably never be.

Here are mine (just a few) :

Ramon Berenguer I of Barcelona, denier:

This little b*st*rd was sold for a five digit number (in euros). Only three known specimens.


Ramon Berenguer I of Barcelona, gold bilingual mancuso:

Arab imitation coins are not my cup of tea, but the fact that it has the name of one of my all-time favorite rulers in roman letters makes it kinda special for me.


Countess Aurembiaix of Urgell, denier:

Probably the most affordable one of my impossible wishlist, but still unaffordable for me, so i guess i'll never have a coin of one of my favorite female characters of the middle ages.


Jaime I the conqueror, gros from Montpellier:

The only bigger-than-denier size silver coin from my favorite king is as unreachable as all the others on this list.


Gold maravedi from the kingdom of Leon. Fernando II:


Or Alfonso IX:


I don't care if it's either the father or the son; both are beautiful, both are majestic, and both are... unreachable for me.


Enrique II of Castilla y Leon, gold Dobla:

The epythome of the middle ages. With its raging knight riding a horse and handling his sword, this is just what medieval coins are supposed to be.


France, Louis XII, écu aux porcs-épics:

The only non spanish coin and also the only non medieval, but i fell in love with those porcupines when i saw them at first time.

That's all! Of course i could keep going on, and on, and on, because my impossible wishlist is as never ending as it's the numismathic. But those are, probably, the most special ones.

What about you? Don't be shy and tell us yours!

Regards,
Tirant

Offa

All coins are equal but some are more equal than others


Figleaf

This design was rejected by Adolf's Reichskommissar for the Netherlands, an Austrian by the name of Seyss-Inquart. He wrote the symbol was not Germanic but "Kitsch" (despicable fake). A boatload had already been struck and almost all were re-melted. Apparently the Reichskommissar had little use for reading and writing. Later in the year, a stamp with the same symbol was issued without a comment from Seyss-Inquart. A dictator's henchman's folly.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offa

All coins are equal but some are more equal than others

Tirant

Quote from: Figleaf on February 03, 2022, 11:01:27 PM
This design was rejected by Adolf's Reichskommissar for the Netherlands, an Austrian by the name of Seyss-Inquart. He wrote the symbol was not Germanic but "Kitsch" (despicable fake). A boatload had already been struck and almost all were re-melted. Apparently the Reichskommissar had little use for reading and writing. Later in the year, a stamp with the same symbol was issued without a comment from Seyss-Inquart. A dictator's henchman's folly.

Peter

Interesting, i didn't know that story.

We can discover many "holy grails" here!

Offa

All coins are equal but some are more equal than others

Alex Island

Quote from: Figleaf on February 03, 2022, 11:01:27 PMThis design was rejected by Adolf's Reichskommissar for the Netherlands, an Austrian by the name of Seyss-Inquart. He wrote the symbol was not Germanic but "Kitsch" (despicable fake). A boatload had already been struck and almost all were re-melted. Apparently the Reichskommissar had little use for reading and writing. Later in the year, a stamp with the same symbol was issued without a comment from Seyss-Inquart. A dictator's henchman's folly.

Peter

For Ukraine there was something similar:

All islands around the world & islands coin

chrisild

As for the "rejected" 10 ct design, there apparently was an article (in the late 1980s) by Kees Broos in the Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek called "Drieloop, driespruit en driekruinenboom – Germaanse symbolen op Nederlandse munten". The first two pages are available as a free download; the rest is locked.

The image of the Ukraine design is not displayed here. Tried the "acsearch.info" link, but maybe the image was (re)moved. Was it the piece described and shown here (reply #1)?

Alex Island

Quote from: chrisild on March 31, 2023, 02:02:24 PMThe image of the Ukraine design is not displayed here. Tried the "acsearch.info" link, but maybe the image was (re)moved. Was it the piece described and shown here (reply #1)?

Yes, these "50 kopeken" are shown  8)
All islands around the world & islands coin

chrisild

Usually I do not buy replicas, but here is an exception I made. Simply because I know I will never have an original. ;) In 1917, Germany – specifically the state of Saxony – issued a 3 Mark coin dedicated to the 400th anniversary of the Lutheran Reformation. The design of the image side I like as it "reflects" a coin from 1522.



You see Elector Frederick III the Wise who protected Martin Luther and founded the University of Wittenberg. Why is Frederick and not Luther on the coin? The official reason was that "royalty only" could be depicted on coins – remember that at that time Germany was not a republic yet. Another possible reason was that the royal house of Saxony was Roman Catholic. So maybe Frederick was a tolerated compromise. :D

Another problem was that in 1917 Germany was still at war, and issuing many silver coins would have been difficult. So the government made 100 of them; the rest was to be minted after the war. The finance minister of Saxony received 30 of them as part of his salary. During the 1918 revolution some were melted down, the remaining few were kept by ... who knows.


Tirant

Interesting, i never heard about this one before! So, maybe there are only a few pieces out there ???

This russian site shows one sold by just 80.000€...

Manzikert

Athenian decadrachm, c.467-465 BC

The last real one I saw for sale was about £250,000, so I have made do with this British Museum electrotype by Robert Ready, c.1860-1890, 34 mm, 48.21 gm (the real one weighs 42.7 gm).

Alan

brandm24

The 1793 chain cent was always on my wish list but always way out of reach for me. Even heavily worn examples where the chain on the reverse are barely visible are very collectible buy still unaffordable to me. Surprisingly, 33,000 coins were struck, but are difficult to find today.

Bruce1793 Chain cent.jpg
Always Faithful

brandm24

Another wish list coin is the 1804 half cent spiked chin variety. The spike is the result of a cracked die. On later struck coins the progression of the crack can be seen which later led to die failure. This example is pronounced but I've seen more severe cases.

Bruce1804 Spiked-Chin Half Cent.jpg
Always Faithful