New topic requested: UK coin obverses

Started by UK Decimal +, December 12, 2009, 06:11:34 AM

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UK Decimal +

As most of you are aware, I am trying to build up a systematic description of UK decimal coins under their various denominations.   I am currently working on decimalisation in the UK (which covers a period of about thirty years).   I have also started several general topics like '2009 - the full set?' and a similar one for 2010.   My aim is to have definitive titles which are either complete in themselves (like the ½p coin, another for the £2), or others which are either complete subjects in themselves or else are open for use when there is more to add to them.   I think that this will help to keep the board tidy by using clear headings but if you don't like my ideas about this, please tell me why.

One subject that I would like to see covered fully is the different obverses used on UK coins.   There are many showing and discussing various portraits, but these then continue with portraits used in the colonies, etc.   What I would like to see is a purely UK version of these.   My suggestion is to have headings like 'George V - the obverse' which would illustrate the various portraits / obverses used during his reign, together with designer (if known) and the names by which the various obverses are known.   I mention this one because I do not recognise the 'modified effigy' used about 1925, also, did it continue in use after then, or was it a once-off variation?   Most of my George V coins are the silver 3d and the farthing which might be too small to show it clearly.

I suggest that a separate topic be raised for each monarch which will make each section of manageable size and easy for reference.   Hopefully, the format could be based on that which I'm using for the different values of decimals, each post having details and illustration(s).   I suggest that perhaps it could be based on coins of similar size such as the ½d and 2p, with other coins having different obverses shown underneath the standard size coin.

Does anyone have the knowledge to be able to take this project on?   I would like to be able to say that I'll do it myself, but my knowledge is too limited.   Please, think about it.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Bimat

Bill,
What do you think about a topic which covers British coins showing denomination on obverse? 8)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

UK Decimal +

What I'm looking for is a series that can become a reference point on just UK obverses.   Perhaps people in other countries would like to do similar things for their homeland.

A lot of the 'denomination on the obverse' coins will get covered by series on the various coins as I get round to other denominations, but a separate article on them would certainly be interesting if anyone has the knowledge to do it.   I admit that at the moment I'd have to look at almost every coin in my collection to find them and it's not something that I've really thought about although I'm sure that some people would find it of great interest.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Figleaf

Bill, why not tackle it the other way around. Show us what you got ask your questions and ask for reactions. Also, do consult Tony Clayton's site. The model is the Sub-saharan Africa thread on the board with the same title. Andrew posted the coin series, complete with gaps and question marks, others filled in the missing information.

Do remember that the site is not a catalogue, It is an accesible chaos and that's part of the reason why it works.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

UK Decimal +

OK Peter, I'll try it your way.

Out of interest, I had Tony's site open in another tab at the time of reading your message and I often refer to it.   I admit that I was also trying to draw more members to posting regularly on the UK boards as there is a lot more information that could be covered there and I like to see headings that will stand the test of time rather than once-off questions that get lost after a while.

My immediate question is this.   I believe that the King George V modified effigy which was used from about 1925 was generally smaller than the previous one.   I also have some small coins dated after then and cannot spot any difference on them.   Was the modified effigy used on all coins and if so what is the difference from the previous ones?

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

UK Decimal +

#5
Here is an example of the problem.

Under the heading Farthings, CY2010 shows:-

1925                         12,634,697.   F 25p,  VF 50p,  EF £4,  Unc £8
1926 Modified effigy      9,792,397.   F 25p,  VF 50p,  EF £4,  Unc £8
1927                          7,868,355.   F 25p,  VF 50p,  EF £4,  Unc £8

Below, left to right, call them 1, 2, 3, and 4,
are coins dated 1925, 1926, 1926 (again) and 1927.

What differences should I be looking for here, please?

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Figleaf

What I like to do is look at the distance between the OM and the top of the king's head. Compare the first pair with the second pair in your picture.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

tonyclayton

The most conspicuous change on the introduction of the modified effigy is that the relief is less.  If the coin is not too worn the letters BM on the truncation are smaller and nearer the back of the neck.

On some denominations such as the penny the change took place during a year, and in that particulr case the position of the colon between BRITT and OMN is the giveaway.

The following showed the change during the year:
Halfcrown, 1926
Shilling, 1926
Sixpence, 1926 (also modified rim during 1925)
Threepence, 1926
Penny, 1926
Halfpenny, 1925


The following did not change during a year:
Florin, modified in 1927
Farthing, modified in 1926
Maundy, modified in 1928

UK Decimal +

Thank you Tony.   I had just been told privately about the position of the initials 'BM'.

I had a package of old halfpennies arrive this morning and I will try to illustrate the difference when I have sorted through them.   As you suggest, the initials wear easily.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.