Author Topic: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area  (Read 3293 times)

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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #90 on: April 17, 2021, 08:59:19 AM »
Which are your favourite coin variants in the sterling area? These are mine.





Jersey's lighthouse 20 pence showed the year on the reverse, in the first year of issue.




Thereafter, the year appeared on the obverse.





Isle of Man.  Left: 20 pence, 1992, with normal rim.  Right: Isle of Man 20 pence, 1993, with wide rim.





UK 50 pence 1969.




UK 50 pence 1982 (proof FDC version).


There were also considerable differences between the older and newer versions of the Britannia design on the reverse of the fifty pence.

1] On the older version, the trident appears closer to the rim. Its middle prong is shorter and the tow other prongs are less broad at the tip.

2] On the newer version, Britannia is holding the trident at a lower angle. This is presumably to avoid overlapping the letter "T" in the word "FIFTY".

3] On the newer version, the crest of Britannia's helmet is wider than before, and the top right-most point of the crest extends further.

4] On the older version, the bottom-most point of Britannia's helmet has a small upward curl to it. This has disappeared on the newer version.

5] On the newer version, Britannia's profile looks somewhat different and seems to be broader than before.

6] On the newer version, Britannia appears to have less hair falling onto her neck.

7] On the older version, Britannia appears to facing more to the front than on the previous version. This has the effect of making the outline of her breasts look more pronounced than on the newer version. More of her stomach is visible, as it is turned more towards us, and you can see more of how the folds of her dress fall.

8] Britannia is sitting in an apparently more "comfortable" position on the newer version, so that her thighs and knees are held higher up.

9] On the newer version, Britannia appears to have fewer folds in her dress, yet the folds at the bottom left, close to the shield, look more complex than in the older version.

10] On the older version, the two main crosses on the representation of the Union Flag on Britannia's shield run together; on the newer version, they are clearly separated by a dividing line.

11] On the newer version, the sprig Britannia is holding appears to have broader leaves. And look at the right-hand side of the sprig on the older version: there are three leaves growing together in a cluster; this threesome has disappeared on the newer version.

12] The fur on the lion's front appears to extend further to the right on the older version. And on the newer version, there is now a gap between the bottom part of the lion's front fur and its feet - though I am not sure whether they are meant to be the lion's feet or whether it is the bottom of Britannia's robe piled up on the floor.

13] On the older version, the numeral zero in the figure fifty seems to be narrower than in the newer version.

These are all the major differences I can see. There do seem to be some other minor differences, but these may simply be down to the different amounts of wear on the coins in the images.
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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #91 on: April 18, 2021, 01:22:27 PM »
Country/territory name.

You will notice that Guernsey, Gibraltar, and St Helena and Ascension always place the country/territory name on the obverse of their circulation coins, while Jersey always places it on the reverse.









From 1971 until 1980, the place name, "ISLE OF MAN", appeared on the reverse of the Manx circulation coins. Since 1980, it has always appeared on the obverse. However, the circulation pound coin retained the practice of showing "ISLE OF MAN" on the reverse until 1986. In 1987, the pound coin showed the Manx version of the name only: "Ellan Vannin" - on the REVERSE. After 1988 it fell into line with the other denominations.





For years, the Falkland Islands placed its name on the reverse of its circulation coins.






Since 2019, the territory name appears on both sides of the circulation coins.
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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #92 on: April 18, 2021, 01:37:40 PM »


From 1971 to 1979 the Isle of Man's circulation coins referred to "ELIZABETH THE SECOND".





Before 2019, the Falkland Islands used "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" on its circulation coins.




Since 2019, the Falkland Islands uses either "QUEEN ELIZABETH II" or "ELIZABETH II" on its circulation coins.



Jersey is now the only entity that uses the phrase "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND" on its circulation coins.
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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #93 on: April 18, 2021, 02:21:53 PM »


St. Helena-Ascension refers to QUEEN ELIZABETH II on its circulation coins.




However, the St. Helena-Ascension 20 pence coin alone omits the word QUEEN.



Of all the coins, the 20 pence coin tends to be the most unusual. Some have wide rims, some do not.

We have seen how Jersey put the year on the reverse of its 1982 20 pence coin but changed thereafter.


The UK put the year on the reverse of its 20 pence coin  from 1982 to 2007, even though the year appeared on the obverse of all its other coins.

The new UK design series of 2007 brought the 20 pence coin into line by showing the year on the obverse.
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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #94 on: April 18, 2021, 09:51:51 PM »
In recent years we have seen a spate of low-value circulation commemoratives. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? Canada produced commemorative 5 cents coins as early as 1943 and 1951, then in 1992 a set of commemorative 25 cents coins celebrating its provinces and territories. Since then, the habit has spread like a disease around the world. Let's look at some occurrences in the sterling area.



In the decimal era, the Isle of Man has long been a purveyor of novelties.





The only explicitly FAO-themed coins of the sterling area.





Gibraltar, 2 pence, 2007, commemorating the Queen's Diamond Wedding.



In 2018 the UK did some alphabet coins. Any other examples, members?
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Offline eurocoin

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #95 on: April 19, 2021, 07:56:06 AM »
The 2 pence of Gibraltar is of course not official. Raphael Maklouf/Tower Mint never asked authorization of the Government of Gibraltar to issue that one. It was only a number of years ago that the Government of Gibraltar first found out about its existence.

Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #96 on: April 19, 2021, 11:37:50 AM »
Thank you, eurocoin. Award yourself a glass of syrup of boiled penguin beak.  :)
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Online <k>

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Re: Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area
« Reply #97 on: April 19, 2021, 11:58:57 AM »


In predecimal times, Jamaica issued commemorative pennies.







Jersey issued commemorative pennies and threepences in predecimal times.







Australia issued commemorative florins (2 shillings), though these had considerable spending power in those days.





New Zealand issued the world's only commemorative half crown (2 shillings and sixpence).
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