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Comparing coins from the whole British sterling area

Started by <k>, February 23, 2021, 08:22:12 PM

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SandyGuyUK

I'm not aware of any other coins that use this type of royal title on them.

As an interesting adjacent point, I remember that great fanfare was made of the fact that Gibraltar changed the legend on its circulating coins (back in 2012?) so that they read "ELIZABETH II" and "QUEEN OF GIBRALTAR" and emphasising that this was the first time that this legend had been used in such a way.  As is often the way with such things, there was clearly some selective amnesia on the part of the issuing body at the time as they'd obviously never looked at the New Zealand dollars of 1979-1982 which bore the James Berry portrait of Liz and stated "ELIZABETH II QUEEN OF NEW ZEALAND".

So whilst I've not exactly answered the question, as a Brit, am I allowed some sort of dispensatory evening meal because of the information I've provided?  ;D
Ian
UK

<k>

Excellent, SandyGuyUK. Tonight you may feast upon deep-fried Mars bars in fishfinger curry.  8)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

 :D :D

Accompanied by a capped bottle of mead? Or maybe warm beer?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Deeman

Quote from: <k> on February 26, 2021, 09:44:02 PM
The legend on some collector coins of Tristan da Cunha refers to the Queen as HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II and sometimes just H.M. QUEEN ELIZABETH II. Some read simply QUEEN ELIZABETH II.
I believe that TDC's pieces are the only ones in the sterling area that use 'HER MAJESTY' or even 'H.M.' Am I right, or do you know of any others?

Clarification sought. Are you referring to obverse legends only?

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on March 25, 2021, 02:08:04 PM
:D :D

Accompanied by a capped bottle of mead? Or maybe warm beer?

Peter

For you, a cocktail of weak English custard and Newcastle brown ale. Enjoy!
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Deeman

Quote from: <k> on February 26, 2021, 09:44:02 PM
The legend on some collector coins of Tristan da Cunha refers to the Queen as HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II and sometimes just H.M. QUEEN ELIZABETH II. Some read simply QUEEN ELIZABETH II.
I believe that TDC's pieces are the only ones in the sterling area that use 'HER MAJESTY' or even 'H.M.' Am I right, or do you know of any others?

Ascension:
Crown-size 50p 2001, The Queen's 75th birthday.
Reverse legend: HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 75th BIRTHDAY

Crown-size 50p 2003, 50th anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Reverse legend: CORONATION OF HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II

Crown-size 50p (silver) 2006, The Queen's 80th birthday.
Reverse legend: HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II 80th BIRTHDAY

St Helena:
Crown-size 50p 2003, 50th anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Reverse legend: CORONATION OF HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II

Crown-size 50p 2003, 50th anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, coronation implements.
Reverse legend: CORONATION OF HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II

<k>

Excellent work, Deeman. For your supper tonight you will be served penguin tikka masala, washed down with dandelion and burdock. :)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Of the sterling area polities, only the UK does not include its name on its coins.




The Isle of Man briefly used its Manx name on its coins.




Tristan da Cunha alone sometimes uses an abbreviation of its name on its coins.

Will BAT and BIOT ever do likewise? I doubt it.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Alan71

Quote from: <k> on March 24, 2021, 03:22:13 PM
According to the Royal Mint, the 20 pence has a wide raised rim.
I was right then?  And I'd not even seen the Royal Mint's definition.

The 1996 football £2 did spring to mind when I did that post, hence why I put "most UK coins have a raised rim".  It worked quite well on that coin, though the segments of the football I think are raised.

Alan71

Quote from: <k> on March 27, 2021, 05:47:59 PM
Of the sterling area polities, only the UK does not include its name on its coins.
I've often wondered what might happen if Charles or William decided to abandon the religious Latin nonsense on coins.  Let's face it, few people in modern Britain know what it means and even if they did, wouldn't be able to relate to it. 

But how would it be replaced?  "Great Britain" excludes Northern Ireland, and "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" is too long (plus, by then it might be just "United Kingdom of England, Wales and Northern Ireland").  Could they abbreviate?  UK of GB and NI?  Or just go with "United Kingdom"?

Deeman

Quote from: Alan71 on March 28, 2021, 09:36:37 PM
I've often wondered what might happen if Charles or William decided to abandon the religious Latin nonsense on coins.  Let's face it, few people in modern Britain know what it means and even if they did, wouldn't be able to relate to it.

Somehow I can't envisage Charles changing anything, but hopefully William will remove Latin references upon his succession and additionally get rid of all that heraldic stuff.
Does anyone know of an other country that has issued something akin to that horrendous Dent design?

Pabitra

Quote from: Deeman on March 29, 2021, 12:10:10 AM

Does anyone know of an other country that has issued something akin to that horrendous Dent design?

If you are talking about jigsaw design then Moldova has done it.
It was discussed in

http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,41826.0.html

And

http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,43367.0.html

Deeman

Quote from: Pabitra on March 29, 2021, 05:35:47 AM
If you are talking about jigsaw design then Moldova has done it.

Thanks, Pabitra, for those links. The jigsaw format just does not work where you have currency sets.

I am also not too keen on commemorative issues employing the principle; e.g. the £2 3-coin set for the 250th Anniversary of Captain Cook's First Voyage.

Deeman

Quote from: Alan71 on March 28, 2021, 09:36:37 PM
But how would it be replaced?  "Great Britain" excludes Northern Ireland, and "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland" is too long (plus, by then it might be just "United Kingdom of England, Wales and Northern Ireland").  Could they abbreviate?  UK of GB and NI?  Or just go with "United Kingdom"?

I am surprised that 'kingdom' has not yet been targeted by the gender neutral brigade.