Author Topic: Maratha, Ahmedabad. Ankushi Paisa in name of Shah Alam II with SWORD RY 22.  (Read 127 times)

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Offline asm

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An extremely difficult coin recently added to my collection. An 'Ankushi Paisa' of Ahmedabad, RY 22 (or may be 23) (the vertical stem of the Aknush is seen on the coin) with a sword below the 'Julus' on the reverse.

I was offered this coin by a friendly dealer saying that the 'sword' looked different. I was also puzzles since I had never seen any such mark on any Ahmedabad Paisa. FOr some time (since the mint was only partly seen) I thought it was an issue of Hyderabad. However, it as Dr Shailendra Bhandare who came to my rescue. He referred me to his article in the JONS on the Maratha coinage of Ahmedabad where he had mentioned a similar coin fromthe Ganesh Nene collection, which is dated RY 21.

What is surprising is that this coin was issued for at least a few months, if not more, and in spite of that the coins are extremely rare to find. I have in my collection a fair number of coins of Shah Alam II, Ankushi Paisa from Ahmedabad, some with AH dates, others with RYs and a few with both AH & RY on the flan (all dated from RY 13 to RY 18 or so) but none of them display this sword symbol which is seen on the coins dated RY 21 & 22 (if not 23). The rupees of these dates are the normal Ankushi Rupees without any additional marks.

Any guesses for what transpired at this time in Ahmedabad to warrant this additional symbol?

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Figleaf

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A difficult piece to get into, Amit. Our expert on the coins of Ahmedabad is asm, but you have already consulted him. At least I can find the date :) The other pictorial elements, ankush and sword, are not obvious to me, probably because I don't know where to look.

I suspect that what you describe as a sword is the long horizontal line on the left picture. Since you know the expert, I trust you are right, but I an wondering. Swords on Indian coins tend to be scimitars and the often have an elaborate hilt. The line does not have the typical curvature of a scimitar and I don't see a hilt. What looks like a dot at extreme left is actually a continuation of the lines, interrupted by two small dings on the surface. I would have taken the long line for a calligraphic dividing line, as on the right picture.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline asm

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Peter, I have marked the Ankush and the Sword on the image. A better attribution is possible when the coin is compared to the other known specimen - which Shailen used in his article. The sword is very similar to those sometimes seen on Haiderabad issues.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

Offline Figleaf

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I didn't know where to look. Now I do. Thank you, Amit.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.