Author Topic: N. A. S.  (Read 150 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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N. A. S.
« on: February 09, 2021, 08:07:47 PM »
As it says SPELPOLLET, I assume this is an amusement token. I could use some help on finding out what N. A. S. stands for and where the company was located. MEKA is the name of the company that produced the token, I suppose?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: N. A. S.
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2021, 07:26:56 AM »
This one is a mystery.

Meka is the name of the maker, yes. Many of the 25 øre spillemærker from Denmark have the Meka mark; I presume it's a Danish company but am not sure on that. It may be that this token was commissioned by a Danish company for use in Sweden. It's definitely in Swedish, though, as polet has one L and one T in Danish, and spelpollett tends to be spillemærke anyway in Danish.

Offline scroggs

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Re: N. A. S.
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2021, 12:51:45 PM »
NAS could stand for Nordisk Automat Service A/S, from Copenhagen in Denmark, liquidated in 1968
found in this article
Nogle svenske poletter prreget i udlandet p96-102
https://numismatik.se/pdf/snt41995.pdf

Offline Figleaf

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Re: N. A. S.
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2021, 02:57:13 PM »
From: Jørgen Sømod: Nogle Svenske polleter præget i udlandet in Svensk Numismatisk Tidskrift May 1995, page 101.

MEKA
The token producer MEKA in Copenhagen, founded around 1940, has struck a number of Swedish tokens. Subsequent cataloging is based on a review of the factory's stock of dies in 1978, archived production cards in 1984, engraver Bent Jensen's original models and his model book as well as known specimen of tokens. After 1978, MEKA has delivered almost no tokens to Sweden. Engraver and medalist Bent Jensen began his work at MEKA in 1957.

Of tokens without the issuer's name can be said:
• A token with 10 on both sides, presumably a gaming token for 10 öre, has probably been delivered to Sweden in the 1950s. Specimen have been found in the possessions of the Danish amusement park owner Hildur Pedersen, who traveled to Sweden in the 1950s and 1960s.
• A token, the same on both sides, which is made in clad-brass and nickel-plated iron and with a four-leaf clover and the inscription VINSTPOLLETT ° VINSTPOLLETT ° and a brass token, also the same on both sides with a large rosette and the inscription ENDAST • FÖR • FÖRSTRÖELSE: are both struck with dies cut by Bent Jensen.


Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.