Author Topic: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins  (Read 5242 times)

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Offline Zantetsuken

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Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« on: November 23, 2009, 04:01:53 AM »
Here is a 1 Dukat coin from CZECHOSLOVAKIA (REPUBLIC) date 1926. The obverse shows the national name, state arms and date. The reverse shows Duke/Prince: Wenceslas (921-935 AD) in armor with legend along the rim. This trade coin was minted from 1923 to 1938, and once more in 1951. Krause mentions there might be one issued in 1939, but only 256 were stuck.



CZECHOSLOVAKIA (REPUBLIC)~1 Dukat 1926
« Last Edit: June 27, 2013, 04:18:16 AM by Zantetsuken »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2009, 09:57:30 AM »
Impressive piece. The knight is saint Wenceslas (Vaclav). The legend is part of the text on the statue of the saint in Wenceslas square in Prague: "Svatý Václave, vévodo ceské zeme, kníže náš, nedej zahynouti nám ni budoucím" ("Saint Wenceslas, duke of the Czech land, prince of ours, don't let perish us nor our descendants" The statue is the site where the proclamation of independence was read in 1918, but tourists often go there for the modest but impressive monument to Jan Palach, who immolated himself to protest the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Zantetsuken

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2009, 01:08:32 PM »
Impressive piece. The knight is saint Wenceslas (Vaclav). The legend is part of the text on the statue of the saint in Wenceslas square in Prague: "Svatý Václave, vévodo ceské zeme, kníže náš, nedej zahynouti nám ni budoucím" ("Saint Wenceslas, duke of the Czech land, prince of ours, don't let perish us nor our descendants" The statue is the site where the proclamation of independence was read in 1918, but tourists often go there for the modest but impressive monument to Jan Palach, who immolated himself to protest the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Peter

Thanks Peter.  I loved the design work of this coin. I bought it this weekend at a pretty decent price. I don't often by gold coins because most are too steep in price for me. The earliest Bohemian I have Dates from the 11th century under Duke/Prince: Vratislav II (1061-1086 AD). Like some of the Anglo-Saxon coins from the same period, they were nicely cropped for the time. It would be nice to have one from Wenceslas I for historic means, but it would probably cost alot if found.

~Daniel



Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2009, 01:31:55 PM »
Hello Daniel,

Although I look at every entry that is made in this forum, I don't usually reply to you as my subject is rather more limited - but I am learning all the time.

This coin really is magnificent and I would like to thank you for sharing it with us, and also for all the hard work that you have put into making WoC more interesting.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2009, 01:45:35 PM »
Congratulations on your acquisition. In these days of irrational gold mania a decent price is an example.

My experience is that early Czech silver is not too wildly expensive, as there is little demand and the coins circulated widely. My Dutch metal detector wielding friends do find Prager groschen occasionally. The trick is to find nice, well centered coins...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Zantetsuken

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2009, 02:03:04 AM »
Hello Daniel,

Although I look at every entry that is made in this forum, I don't usually reply to you as my subject is rather more limited - but I am learning all the time.

This coin really is magnificent and I would like to thank you for sharing it with us, and also for all the hard work that you have put into making WoC more interesting.

Bill.

Thanks Bill. This coin actually looks even better in person, but I think did pretty good in capturing the tone and luster with this photo. I especially love Wenceslas's image on the reverse side. The design work for this was beautifully rendered. I don't collect many gold coins, but I'm certainly glad to have aquired this. Best regards.

~Daniel.

Offline Zantetsuken

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2009, 02:29:02 AM »
Congratulations on your acquisition. In these days of irrational gold mania a decent price is an example.

My experience is that early Czech silver is not too wildly expensive, as there is little demand and the coins circulated widely. My Dutch metal detector wielding friends do find Prager groschen occasionally. The trick is to find nice, well centered coins...

Peter

Thanks Peter. Some of those Pragergroschens are very nice. Here's one of mine issued under King: Wenceslas II 1278-1305 AD. This has a decent strike and is well centered (IMO).

~Daniel



BOHEMIA (KINGDOM)~ AR Pragergroschen 1278-1305 AD
« Last Edit: June 27, 2013, 04:19:14 AM by Zantetsuken »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Czechoslovakia: Trade Coins
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2009, 03:28:38 PM »
Note the way the lion's double tail is rendered on this coin and on your gold coin. It is typical for Czech/Bohemian coins. The influence of the gros Tournois is easy to see...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.