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Coin Emoji

Started by chrisild, November 08, 2020, 06:19:16 PM

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chrisild

We have been able to use different smilies and heart shapes, foods and drinks, etc. etc. when messaging with our smartphones. But where are the coins? :D Well, that "problem" has been addressed.

If your phone has iOS 14.2 or Android 11, you may now use the brand new "coin" emoji. Have a look at the attached image from https://blog.emojipedia.org/ ... You will also note that the Android and iOS versions are somewhat different. The Unicode Consortium agreed on a whole bunch of new emojis, but it is basically up to the manufacturers to "visualize" the code.

So Apple picked an "American style" piece, with a flying eagle and the inscription "The Crazy Ones" and the date 2020. Google chose an abstracted version of a bank building surrounded by stars. What I also find interesting is how that emoji made it to Unicode: It was David McCarthy, a Kagin's numismatist, who came up with the idea. Here are some previous suggestions that, at that time, did not make it:

https://www.unicode.org/L2/L2017/17229-coin-emoji.pdf
https://www.unicode.org/L2/L2018/18310-coin-emoji.pdf

But now we have one! ;)

Christian

Figleaf

Thank you. I wonder why Apple thinks coins are Eisenhower dollars and even more why Google thinks banks look like classical temples. I have been to a very large number of banks and not one of them looked like a classical temple. The only "modern" building looking like that I remember visiting is the Madeleine and that's a church. They should have asked Frizio Annovi! 8)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Well, the stock exchange (Palais Brongniart) in Paris has a vaguely similar style. And remember the Dublin WoC meeting? Next to Trinity College there is the Bank of Ireland building - not built for this (commercial) bank, and yet used by it. More columns for you. ;)

In the US for example there are lots of buildings in that neoclassicist style, including several banks (before they went to glass and steel high rises) or, ta-daa, the Old Mint building in San Francisco. So yes, the columns could indicate a courthouse, a stock exchange, a mint ... Fortunately those emojis are so small that we will not really see all those details anyway when we use them in messages, hehe.

Christian

Figleaf

#3
Quote from: chrisild on November 08, 2020, 06:19:16 PM
But now we have one!

Actually, now we have at least three. This thread inspired annovi.frizio, Izotz and me to create a European counterpart for the two American coin emojis. The design is based on a short cross silver denarius as struck around 1000 to 1250 AD in a number of regions in all parts of Europe. Typically, part of the "legend" is illegible. :) Through history, several denominations had a name derived from denarius, or its Northern European equivalent, penny, pfennig, penning etcetera. It is available from our own smiley collection by clicking on [more] and it looks like THIS (DRRRRUM ROLL!)

:coinsilver:

The large version is attached. See also Frizio's collection.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Great – that emoji has my vote. :) Thanks for your joint efforts!

Christian

annovi.frizio

Frizio Graphic Designer
http://www.friziodesign.it/
..............................................................

FosseWay

What sprang first to mind for me on seeing the Google one is the national side of the German brass eurocent coins - i.e. the Brandenburger Tor. While the stylised façade on closer inspection is not hugely similar to the BT, at smaller size and surrounded by stars I think the similarity is fairly striking.

As to banks with classical façades of this kind - will this do?  ;D


chrisild

Hmm, the Brandenburg Gate does not have that triangular gable above the columns. And it is not anywhere near Google's HQ, hehe. The Bank of England makes more sense. I am still in favor of the Granite Lady, i.e. the former San Francisco Mint.



But when it comes to a "coin" emoji that would work well around here, the design that Figleaf and Frizio show us here is definitely better. :D

Christian

izotz

I think annovi.frizio's design is pretty neat. Obviously when you scale it down to an icon size the resolution is lower, but still I liked Figleaf's idea of having our own emoji as well.

I experimented with our favicon. You can appreciate it in your browser's tabs or bookmarks. I tried to provide support for the different resolutions that systems allow, such as Macbooks. If we don't like it we can roll it back.

annovi.frizio

Frizio Graphic Designer
http://www.friziodesign.it/
..............................................................

Figleaf

Works fine as a favicon on my Mac! All the details are there when I enlarge it. Double thanks, Frizio.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.