Classic national women on coins

Started by <k>, August 09, 2020, 07:52:54 PM

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<k>

#15
Poland 2 zloty 1925.jpg

Poland, 2 zloty, 1925.
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<k>

#16
Romania 1 leu 1910.jpg

Romania, 1 leu, 1910.


What is this instrument that the young lady is using?

Is she trying to ward off vampires - or the First World War?
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<k>

#17


Switzerland, 100 francs, 1925 only. 

This is a bullion coin - I have made an exception in this case.  :-\

Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions.


See also:

1] Coinage of Switzerland.

2] Pattern coins from Switzerland.
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<k>

#18
Vietnam 10 xu 1953.jpg

Vietnam, 10 xu, 1953.  Three heads are better than one.
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<k>

#19
Vietnam 50 xu 1953.jpg

Vietnam, 50 xu, 1953. 

Are they the same women? Are they cousins?
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<k>

#20
Yugoslavia, 10 dinara, 1955.jpg

Yugoslavia, 10 dinara, 1955. 

A neo-Stalinist portrayal of the heroic peasant woman.
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chrisild

Quote from: <k> on August 09, 2020, 08:11:22 PM
Romania, 1 leu, 1910.

What is this instrument that the young lady is using?

Oh, I can clearly see a spindle in her right hand, and a spinning fork and sickle in her belt.  8)

(Actually a combination of this page and Google Translate helped a little ...)

Christian

<k>

Thank you. I thought these things had died out with witchcraft. I haven't a clue what a spinning fork is or is used for.
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stef

Quote from: <k> on August 09, 2020, 08:11:22 PM
Romania, 1 leu, 1910.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distaff
What is this instrument that the young lady is using? Is she trying to ward off vampires - or the First World War?
Wikipedia and google are our friends: distaff and spindle

<k>

I think you must have been alive in the olden days, stef.
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stef

#25
mapuche.jpg

Chile, 100 pesos, 2001-.

Native Mapuche woman.

<k>

#26


Guatemala, 25 centavos, 1964.




Guatemala, 25 centavos, 1950.

See also: Guatemalan and Paraguayan variations.
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<k>

#27
Luxembourg 1 franc 1939.jpg

Luxembourg, 1 franc, 1939.


Notice the Luxembourgish word 'FRANG'.

Notice also how it is superimposed on the figure '1'. Unusual.
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chrisild

The way the currency unit name is positioned is indeed interesting. But the characters look as if they had given some kid five single-character rubber stamps – "here, put them on the '1' somehow!" ;D

The country name in Luxembourgish appears on several coins, either in the modern spelling Lëtzebuerg or in the older version Letzeburg. Interestingly, on the IML and BCL banknotes – where there is more space, hehe – they used both French (e.g. "cent francs") and Luxembourgish ("honnert frang") ...

Christian

<k>

#29
STUDENT WOMAN, MOZAMBIQUE




Mozambique, 1 metical, 1980. Brass.                N# 14048

Mozambique, 1 metical, 1986. Aluminium.            N# 10321

Mozambique, 1 metical, 1994. Brass-plated steel.  N# 4630

Mozambique, 1 metical, 2006. Nickel-plated steel.  N# 3122

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See: The Royal Mint Museum.