Author Topic: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea  (Read 1029 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2020, 11:57:26 PM »



The obverse of a New Guinea George VI shilling of 1938.

The reverse design remained unchanged.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2020, 01:00:07 AM »


The New Guinea six pence of 1943.



The outbreak of the Second World War and the Japanese invasion of New Guinea in 1942 meant that the next New Guinea coins were not issued until 1943.

In fact, only the sixpence was issued in 1943. Curiously, the denomination was now shown on the reverse as 'SIX PENCE'.

Previously the denomination had been shown as '6 PENCE'.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2020, 01:00:38 AM »


The New Guinea three pence of 1944.



In 1944 the threepence was issued once more.

This time the denomination was shown as 'THREE PENCE' instead of '3 PENCE'.

The only other coin issued that year was the penny, but it retained the same design and legend.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #33 on: June 12, 2020, 01:01:05 AM »



The only New Guinea coin produced and dated 1945, the final year of the Second World War, was the shilling.

It was also the final coin produced for the Territory of New Guinea.


Apart from the year, it retained the same design and legend as before.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2020, 01:18:53 AM »


Map of Papua and New Guinea in the 1950s.



From Wikipedia:

Following the return to civil administration after World War II, the Australian section of New Guinea was known as the Territory of Papua-New Guinea from 1945 to 1949 and then as the Territory of Papua and New Guinea.

The Papua and New Guinea Act 1949 united the Territory of Papua and the Territory of New Guinea as the Territory of Papua and New Guinea. However, for the purposes of Australian nationality a distinction was maintained between the two territories.

In effect, this meant that the population of the Territory of Papua remained Australian by nationality, whilst the population of the Territory of New Guinea did not receive Australian nationality. This was because Australia merely adminstered the Territory of New Guinea under the auspices of the United Nations, whereas it continued to rule the Territory of Papua as an external Australian territory.

Under Australian Minister for External Territories Andrew Peacock, the Territory of Papua and New Guinea adopted self-government in 1972. On 15 September 1975, during the term of the Whitlam Government in Australia, the Territory became the independent nation of Papua New Guinea.

Although the rest of the Dutch East Indies had achieved independence from the Netherlands as Indonesia on 27 December 1949, the Netherlands retained control of western New Guinea. Eventually in 1963 Indonesia annexed West Papua, as it was then known, from the Netherlands, with the support of the USA.
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Offline <k>

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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #36 on: June 12, 2020, 01:33:30 AM »
Now a question for the members. I have read that the Japanese occupation of New Guinea (the whole island and its adjacent islands) lasted from 1942 to 1945.

How is it then that coins dated 1943, 1944 and 1945 were produced for the Territory of New Guinea?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2020, 11:42:33 AM »
There were active Japanese troops on the Southern Dutch part of New Guinea until 1945. The British/Australian part was never completely occupied. The South-Western Eastern "tail", around Port Moresby remained in Allied hands as the Solomon campaign took shape, covering the North-Eastern flank of New Guinea and making it impossible to approach New Guinea by water at night. After the destruction of a convoy by bombing and the sinking of a number of barges by PT boats, Tokyo gave up reinforcing New Guinea and capturing Port Moresby.

In May 1943, US forces landed on Kiriwina and Woodlark, two small islands to the North-East of New Guinea, threatening the Japanese at Buna and Dobodura. Both towns were taken from Port Moresby, starting the "New Guinea campaign", a joint operation of army troops under MacArthur and a navy unit (VII Phib) under Rear Admiral David E. Barbey. Their first operation, taking the Huon Gulf and Nassau bay by landing at Lae and taking Salamaua and Finchhafen in September 1943 was a success that effectively isolated the Bismarcks and its pivotal command centre, Rabaul. Landings on New Britain in December 1943 overshadowed the continued rout of the Japanese on the Northern coast of New Guinea in 1944, including a surprise landing at Saidor on 2nd January 1944 that turned the garrison of bypassed Sio into fugitives in the jungle. The survivors could continue their long march when Australian troops attacked Madang and the Japanese fell back on Wewak.

At that point, MacArthur wanted to by-pass Wewak with a landing at Hollandia in the centre of New Guinea, on the North coast. This turned into a campaign by itself to destroy all possibilities of Japanese air operations in the area. The landings became the largest amphibious operation up to that time in the Pacific theatre. While successful, Wewak remained in Japanese hands. Landings on the New Guinea mainland opposite Wakde, an island on the North coast, presented a similar story. The landings went smooth but resistance continued until the end of the war. Landings at Biak on May 27, 1944 went so badly they threatened to halt MacArthur in his tracks. From then on, US military attention would be predominantly on 5th Fleet operations and keeping MacArthur from going wild.

The naval battle of the Philippine sea (June 19 and 20, 1944) rescued MacArthur. In September 1944, he could resume his return to the Philippines by taking Morotai. The Japanese on New Guinea were isolated, without air or naval support and suffering from every imaginable jungle disease, but, at great cost, they held out until the end of the war.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 12, 2020, 12:36:11 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2020, 12:05:17 PM »
Thank you, Figleaf.

 
« Last Edit: June 12, 2020, 02:29:52 PM by <k> »
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Offline <k>

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Re: Coinage of the Territory of New Guinea
« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2020, 12:06:28 PM »
My other question is: does anybody know whether the coins of the Territory of New Guinea also circulated (by migration) in the Territory of Papua?
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