Author Topic: Germany, Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg: Double death taler, 1622  (Read 376 times)

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Offline <k>

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NumisBids: Bruun Rasmussen Auction 894, Lot 386

Germany

Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg, Johann the Younger, 1564-1622, Reinfeld, 2 Thaler 1622, Dav. 3715, Lange 543, JSJ 22, Sieg 22, 57.64 g - a well-preserved quite lustrous, rare and spectacular double 'Death Taler' commemorating duke Johann the Younger, brother to Danish king Frederik II, and struck after his death in 1622.


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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Germany, Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg: Double death taler, 1622
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2020, 11:16:32 AM »
Spectacular indeed. TFP.

Fun to see that the skull (without jaw bone) and crossed bones are used as a very late medieval memento mori. Enough to confuse a Disney pirate. Compare also the Roman posthumus issues, announcements of divinity, not a stark reminder of mortality and yet both expressions of culture.

Final thought: COVID-19, of course. I presume that is what moved you to post this. I hear voices saying: what's all the fuss about? People have always been dying. The oldies would have died anyway. "Dead wood" is what one particularly insensitive commentator called the elderly.

I find that both true and irrelevant. The coin you posted says "your actions by your life will determine how you will be remembered". It does not proclaim "live it up, you'll die anyway". Similarly, I think that shrugging over untimely mass death (200 000 worldwide now) is an unpardonable attitude towards human life. Yes, we make decisions that may or will cause death regularly, whether it is in the car or, these days, going to the beach, but those deaths are unwitting. If we are confronted with a preventable death, morality commands that we take action. How we react is how we build our memory after death.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2020, 01:09:31 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.