Author Topic: UK Commemorative coins for 2021  (Read 8693 times)

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Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2020, 11:28:00 AM »
The 2021-dated shield 50p coin is now available in the My Lost Tooth Celebration Pack. Remarkable that a 2021-dated standard coin is already available.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2020, 12:11:23 PM »
The 2021-dated shield 50p coin is now available in the My Lost Tooth Celebration Pack. Remarkable that a 2021-dated standard coin is already available.

Times must be hard for the RM.

How unimaginative!

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2020, 02:10:32 PM »
The Royal Mint will next year issue a commemorative 50p coin for Charles Babbage depicting numbers that make his name in code. It will also issue commemorative 50p coins related to Winnie the Pooh. The latter coins will depict characters of Winnie the Pooh and a separate coin for Owl.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #33 on: December 17, 2020, 03:57:27 PM »
The Charles Babbage (1791-1871) issue commemorates the 150th anniversary of his death.

Charles Babbage is considered the ‘father of the computer.’ The 1820s saw Babbage work on his Difference Engine, a calculator that prepares numerical tables, using a mathematical technique known as the method of finite differences, by arithmetical addition only. It consisted of two major parts — the calculating mechanism and the printing and control mechanism. It operated on digits 0–9, represented by positions on toothed wheels and was designed to stamp its output into soft metal, which could later be used to produce a printing plate. In 1832, a working part (one-seventh) of the calculating section was assembled, but it was limited to two orders of differences and five figures, suitable for demonstration purposes only. It was about 24” high, 19” wide, and 14” deep, and worked perfectly producing tables based on the quadratic n2+n+41. The terms of this sequence are 41 (n=0), 43 (n=1), 47 (n=2), 53 (n=3), 61 (n=4) …, giving the differences of the terms as 2, 4, 6, 8 … and the second differences a constant value of 2, 2, 2 …
« Last Edit: December 17, 2020, 05:02:46 PM by Deeman »

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #34 on: December 17, 2020, 03:58:22 PM »
All design and construction ceased on Babbage’s Difference Engine in 1833, when Joseph Clement, the machinist responsible for actually building the machine, refused to continue unless he was prepaid. Babbage then worked on the design for a more complex Analytical Engine, a revolutionary device on which his fame as a computer pioneer now largely rests. This was intended to be able to perform any arithmetical calculation using punched cards that would deliver the instructions, as well as a memory unit to store numbers and many other fundamental components of today's computers. Babbage’s friend, mathematician Ada Lovelace (Lord Byron’s daughter), worked on developing the instructions for the Analytical Engine.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #35 on: December 17, 2020, 03:59:50 PM »
In 1846, Babbage abruptly changed course, and worked for two years on the design for Difference Engine 2, a refinement of the first requiring only a third as many parts.
Neither the Analytical Engine, nor Difference Engine 2, were finished in Babbage's lifetime due to lack of funding.

In 1991, the 200th anniversary of Babbage’s birth, the Science Museum constructed a functioning Difference Engine 2 based on Babbage’s original drawings. It consisted of 8,000 parts, weighed over 5t and measured 11ft long. It has a total memory < 1kB with eight 31-digit number registers (7 difference columns + result column) for solving polynomials with terms up to n7. In 2000, the Science Museum completed the printer Babbage had designed for the difference engine.

Babbage was a lifelong inventor. He invented the pilot (cow-catcher), which is the metal frame attached to the front of locomotives that clears the tracks of obstacles, and a dynamometer car able to measure train performance. He constructed the first known ophthalmoscope in 1847 for internal eye examinations, but didn’t patent it and the credit went to Herman von Helmhotz 4 years later. He pioneered an occulting light mechanism (a light with mechanical shutters to create a unique flashing signal) to help with coastal ship navigation.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2020, 05:01:41 PM by Deeman »

Offline eurocoin

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #36 on: December 17, 2020, 06:38:57 PM »
The designs of the first few commemorative coins of 2021 are of acceptable quality. A tad boring, maybe. But at least they are not very bad. 2021 is going to be a good year already.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #37 on: December 18, 2020, 04:35:13 PM »
The Royal Mint will also issue commemorative 50p coins related to Winnie the Pooh. The latter coins will depict characters of Winnie the Pooh and a separate coin for Owl.

An email from RM slightly differs from the proclamation. RM indicate separate coins for Owl & Tigger together with one for Winnie the Pooh and friends.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #38 on: December 19, 2020, 11:21:14 AM »
The designs of the first few commemorative coins of 2021 are of acceptable quality. A tad boring, maybe. But at least they are not very bad. 2021 is going to be a good year already.

That's ten 50p coins already advised:
John Logie Baird, decimalisation anniversary, Olympics, 3 x prehistoric reptiles, 3 x AA Milne characters & Charles Babbage.
Plus two £2 coins:
Walter Scott & HG Wells.

A bumper year ahead by the looks of it!

Offline Alan71

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #39 on: December 19, 2020, 01:01:37 PM »
That's ten 50p coins already advised
Plus two £2 coins
A bumper year ahead by the looks of it!
Nothing new there then!  Did we have that many this year?  If we didn’t, it certainly felt like it...

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #40 on: December 19, 2020, 01:30:27 PM »
Nothing new there then!  Did we have that many this year?  If we didn’t, it certainly felt like it...

This year we had twelve 50p and four £2 coins.
I think we will almost certainly surpass the 50p count with the anticipated diversity issues and a Christmas coin, and I feel that there is the possibility of others to be added.
Possibly the £2 coins will remain at four as it has been for the past two years.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #41 on: December 21, 2020, 05:28:30 PM »
The Royal Mint will next year issue a commemorative 50p coin for Charles Babbage depicting numbers that make his name in code.

An 8-bit binary code uses unique groups of eight 0s and 1s at a time to code for different letters, numbers, and symbols (e.g. *, &, ^, %, !).

If BABBAGE was spelt using capitals we should see:

B = 01000010
A = 01000001
B = 01000010
B = 01000010
A = 01000001
G = 01000111
E = 01000101

If spelt Babbage we should see:

B = 01000010
a = 01100001
b = 01100010
b = 01100010
a = 01100001
g = 01100111
e = 01100101

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #42 on: December 29, 2020, 10:33:41 AM »
Ahead of the 50p coin issue for the 50th anniversary of decimalisation, which I assume will be issued with the year pack, I thought it would be useful to provide a short summary.

Full decimal coinage was introduced on 15 Feb 1971. The pound was now made up of 100 ‘new pence’ instead of 240d with six new denominations, 50p to halfpenny.
First to make appearance were the 5p and 10p coins in 1968 which were issued alongside shillings (1/-) and florins (2/-) as they were directly compatible, with the 50p coin issued the following year on 14 Oct 1969 to replace the ten-shilling note (10/-). The ½p, 1p and 2p coins were released into circulation when full decimal coinage was introduced.
The designs were:
Bronze - ½p St Edward's Crown; 1p crowned portcullis (Badge of the Palace of Westminster); 2p Badge of the Prince of Wales, a plume of ostrich feathers within a coronet above the motto ICH DIEN (I serve).
Cupro-nickel - 5p the Badge of Scotland, a thistle royally crowned; 10p part of the Crest of England, a lion passant guardant royally crowned; 50p - Britannia seated beside a lion, with a shield resting against her right side, holding a trident in her right hand and an olive branch in her left hand.

The term 'new penny' was dropped in 1982 on the grounds that after ten years it was no longer 'new'. In that year a new denomination, the 20p coin was introduced.

Dates for pre-decimal currency becoming demonetised are:
10/- note - 22 Nov 1970; 2/6 half-crown - 1 Jan 1970; 2/- florin - 30 Jun 1993; 1/- shilling - 31 Dec 1990; 6d sixpence (continued circulating at 2½ new pence) - 30 Jun 1980; 3d brass threepence - 31 Aug 1971; 1d penny - 31 Aug 1971; ½d halfpenny - 01 Aug 1969.

Offline Deeman

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #43 on: December 29, 2020, 12:37:22 PM »
Ahead of the £2 coin issue for the 250th anniversary of the birth of Sir Walter Scott, which I assume will be issued with the year pack, I thought some background information might be of interest.

Edinburgh born Sir Walter Scott was a poet, novelist, playwright and historian. His first publication was a three-volume set of collected Scottish ballads, The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Borders in 1802, which was an early indicator of his interest in Scottish history from a literary standpoint.

It was in the Borders that Scott was happiest and it was there that he followed up the Minstrelsy with a series of hugely popular narrative poems, including Marmion (1808) and The Lady of the Lake (1810). Marmion is about events of the Battle of Flodden, fought between England and Scotland in 1513, and introduced his most oft’ quoted rhyme:
Oh! what a tangled web we weave
When first we practise to deceive!

The Lady of the Lake contains all the trappings of romance. Set in 16th-century Scotland around the border between the Highlands and the Lowlands, it depicts a love story against a background of conflicting communities and cultures.

Scott ventured into novels, blending fictional dialogue with historical fact, and is regarded as having created the historical novel on the publication of Waverley in 1814, which is the only book in the world to have a train station (Edinburgh Central) named after it. It relates the story of a young dreamer and soldier, Edward Waverley, as he journeys north from the south of England into the Highlands and the heart of the 1745 Jacobite uprising and aftermath.
Along with Guy Mannering (1815) and The Antiquary (1816), each of Scott’s first three novels is set at a time of national crisis and are studies in the evolution of modern Scotland. The Tale of Old Mortality (1816) examines the creation of a political middle ground between opposing fanaticisms. Rob Roy (1817) is set during the 1715 Jacobite uprising, and provides the background for a journey of self-discovery for another young romantic protagonist who meets the larger-than-life title character, Rob Roy MacGregor. The Bride of Lammermoor (1819) is a Romeo and Juliet tragedy with an emphasis on the political context that destroys the lovers. The Heart of Midlothian (1818) is an extended but unresolved debate on the nature of justice, while Ivanhoe (1820), the first novel to be set outside Scotland, fashions a moral tale on male power and the abuse of women and racial minorities.


Online Figleaf

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Re: UK Commemorative coins for 2021
« Reply #44 on: December 29, 2020, 03:59:40 PM »
Thank you for the write-up, Deeman. There is no doubt that Walter Scott is a recognised member of the English language pantheon.

As a youngster, I was quite fond of Scott. I read the majority of his novels. However, I find that either they or I age badly. The high Victorian romanticism and saccharine endings do not rhyme with life at the times he describes being nasty, brutish and short in reality. His stories fit in well with Victorian interest in archeology and history that destroyed many historic sites and created myths that took centuries to be dismantled. Of course, Romanticism did similar things in France and Germany, but that doesn't make it better.

In the end, I switched to Kipling and from there to Poe, Wilde and Joseph Conrad. I just realised none of them are remembered on a coin :) It must be me ageing badly.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.