Author Topic: What is a medal-coin?  (Read 5557 times)

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Online Figleaf

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2009, 11:54:29 AM »
Contentious tail of thread removed with OK from moderator.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

RHM22

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2009, 03:15:42 PM »
19th century European numismatics is riddled with so-called "semi-medallic issues", which are basically medals that were given a face value, but not legal tender status. Many did circulate, as evidenced by an earlier post by Figleaf.

Offline Prussian1

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2009, 06:29:54 PM »
19th century European numismatics is riddled with so-called "semi-medallic issues", which are basically medals that were given a face value, but not legal tender status. Many did circulate, as evidenced by an earlier post by Figleaf.

You can go back further than the 19th century. Here are a few of them.
Padeborn Germany issued three of them in the 18th century. The 1719 Regiments Taler (sede vacante). The 1761 sede vacante Taler and the 1783 Election of Wilhelm Anton Taler. Also, Sweden during the occupation of Pomerania issued medallic Talers in 1709. There are many more that were issued. It has been debated over by many experts if any of the above mentioned Talers were of legal tender. 
Prussian1

RHM22

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2009, 06:46:22 PM »
You can go back further than the 19th century. Here are a few of them.
Padeborn Germany issued three of them in the 18th century. The 1719 Regiments Taler (sede vacante). The 1761 sede vacante Taler and the 1783 Election of Wilhelm Anton Taler. Also, Sweden during the occupation of Pomerania issued medallic Talers in 1709. There are many more that were issued. It has been debated over by many experts if any of the above mentioned Talers were of legal tender. 

18th century coins are one of my weak areas, but I see what you mean. Some doubt the validity of the term "semi-medallic", but I think it's perfectly acceptable. Even the simplified version "coin-medal" is acceptable in some instances to describe certain European pieces minted as late the mid-20th century.

translateltd

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #19 on: December 27, 2009, 07:31:34 PM »
I don't really have a problem with the term either, to designate a piece that is essentially a medallic issue as you describe, but unfortunately it is now inextricably linked in the minds of our membership with a recently banned member who held strong views on the subject, and offensive views on much else, which rather gave it a bad press ...


RHM22

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2009, 12:07:45 AM »
I don't really have a problem with the term either, to designate a piece that is essentially a medallic issue as you describe, but unfortunately it is now inextricably linked in the minds of our membership with a recently banned member who held strong views on the subject, and offensive views on much else, which rather gave it a bad press ...



I understand what you mean. I didn't the member's messages, so I didn't know that bit.

Offline chrisild

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Re: What is a medal-coin?
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2009, 01:27:39 AM »
As far as that particular topic is concerned, you did not miss much. It could actually be a handy term term if applied selectively. But if somebody uses it for pretty much every coin that cannot be had at face, and pretends it is commonly used, that defeats the purpose, I think.

R.I.P., M.-C. :)

Christian