Author Topic: What is a medal-coin?  (Read 5445 times)

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BC Numismatics

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What is a medal-coin?
« on: October 25, 2009, 07:28:45 PM »
Peter,
  What is wrong with using the term 'medal-coin'? I am not the only one who uses it.Martin also does as well,especially in relation to the deluge of medal-coins that are churned out in the name of New Zealand every year.

Aidan.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2009, 06:53:27 AM by BC Numismatics »

Online Figleaf

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2009, 08:06:43 PM »
What's wrong with it is that it irritates people. You lose goodwill and gain nothing by using the term. That's a bad deal.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2009, 12:08:56 AM »
So how would I describe my Austrian 1879 2-Gulden Wedding piece.  I always considered it a medal-coin or a coin-medal.  Maybe a commemorative?

Dale


What's wrong with it is that it irritates people. You lose goodwill and gain nothing by using the term. That's a bad deal.

Peter

Offline thelawnet

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2009, 01:04:14 AM »
So how would I describe my Austrian 1879 2-Gulden Wedding piece.  I always considered it a medal-coin or a coin-medal.  Maybe a commemorative?

Dale



I'm not familiar with this piece, but commemorative sounds right to me.

Modern coins of this ilk are essentially numismatic products, and the term NCLT (non-circulating legal tender) seems best to me, to reflect the fact that their purpose is not to serve as currency, but to make money for the mint.

Offline chrisild

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2009, 01:08:39 AM »
Guess most collectors would call it a coin. (Doesn't it even say ZWEI GULDEN on the edge?) Of course there are pieces that could be considered hybrid; think of those Icelandic medals (umm, coins) dated 1930 commemorating the Alþingi jubilee. But it seems to me that you are looking for a term that describes very few specific cases only ...

Christian

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2009, 01:21:50 AM »
Not modern at all unless you consider 1879 modern.  Here it is
Dale

"Modern coins of this ilk are essentially numismatic products, and the term NCLT "

I'm not familiar with this piece, but commemorative sounds right to me.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2009, 01:28:05 AM by dalehall »

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2009, 01:26:26 AM »
Yes it does among other inscriptions.
Dale

(Doesn't it even say ZWEI GULDEN on the edge?)
Christian

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2009, 01:30:12 AM »
There is no rotation, the obverse is oriented the same as the reverse.

Dale

So it's obviously a coin-medal, but with medal-coin rotation.

Offline UK Decimal +

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2009, 01:31:42 AM »
No general term need ever be used.   Just put it as fact, e.g:

UK 2009 £5 500yrs Accession Henry VIII - BU*
UK 2009 £5 150yrs Big Ben - Proof only*
UK 2009 £5 Countdown to 2012 (3) Swimming - Circulation*

* Note that at this stage I do not know whether these will all be circulation coins or not, but I am just using them as examples.   Proof, BU, Circ, etc. are definatite descriptions and 'only' can be added when necessary.

Where applicable, descriptions like 'Platinum Piedfort Proof' can be used.   As I have said before, one has to be very careful about using terms, even 'NCLT', before the plans for the year are disclosed and even after that, no general term is necessary; put full details every time and avoid confusion.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2009, 01:33:50 AM »
I will have to take your word for that as here it is called medal orientation or medal aligned   ;)

It is not in my krause but I have seen it in other catalogs listed as a medallic coin.  OOPS!  medallic issue actually.

Dale
« Last Edit: October 26, 2009, 01:56:46 AM by dalehall »

Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2009, 01:56:24 AM »
Ahhh  I understand now  ;D  I was tempted to do that but..... I kinda like it here

Dale


Offline Prosit

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What is a medal coin?
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2009, 02:05:29 AM »
OMG, I don't know if those are coins or not but I would really love to have one.
I think they are beautiful.  Also the 1904 Saint Louis MEDAL is worth drooling over, IMO  :)
Dale


Of course there are pieces that could be considered hybrid; think of those Icelandic medals (umm, coins) dated 1930 commemorating the Alþingi jubilee. Christian
« Last Edit: October 26, 2009, 02:14:12 AM by dalehall »

Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: What is a medal coin?
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2009, 03:55:31 PM »
I will stick on the lines of replies that I have given previously on this subject.

COIN   Use the full definition such as:
UK 2009 or 2010 50p Blue Peter High Jump.   Likewise:
UK 2009 £5 Henry VIII Platinum Piedfort
It is a coin if it is (or was) legal tender with the value shown on it.

BULLION   This is produced for its metal value and has no face value:
UK 2010 Gold Sovereign

MEDAL   An award for a heroic act, but having no face value, such as:
The Victoria Cross

MEDALLION   Issued to commemorate an occasion, theme or event, but having no legitimate face value such as :
WWF Panda Bear

Bill.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2009, 04:02:56 PM by UK Decimal + »
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

Austrokiwi

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Re: What is a medal coin?
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2009, 04:11:04 PM »
One can get very confused very quickly.   Medal-coin just sounds clumsy..........Though in certain contexts it may work.   Now as to the discussion about medal Orientation of coin orientation, some true coins do have a medal orientation.  Eg: 1773 Maria Theresa Taler

Online Figleaf

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Re: What is a medal coin?
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2009, 08:20:34 PM »
The only pieces worthy of the name medal coin I can think of are discussed here. The one discussed above didn't circulate, so I wouldn't call it a coin and it has a denomination, no matter how well hidden, so I wouldn't call it a medal. (In Dutch, medaillon is a small amulet, to be worn on a chain around the neck or a good piece of meat. :))

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.