UK text-heavy 50 pence and 2 pound designs

Started by <k>, June 18, 2019, 12:22:51 AM

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<k>

Quote from: Alan71 on September 14, 2019, 03:37:30 PM
On the other extreme...

Back in the day, some UK commemoratives weren't wordy enough.  The most common one of all - the 1973 EEC 50p - had no text on it at all. For decades, I thought the design was just an alternative to Britannia, but with the one date.



And here it is, to illustrate your point. It never occurred to me that some people did not know the meaning of the design. Years pass, I suppose, and these things get lost in the mists of time.

Quote
These days, of course, information is at our fingertips every second of the day (well, perhaps not so much in <k>'s case if he doesn't have a smartphone...)

What a cheek!  :P  When I'm out, I use the time to process my genius thoughts and plan topics such as this, which has attracted oodles of page views in just a few short months.  8)  I probably spend 2 to 3 hours per day browsing the internet on my desktop in the comfort of my home, and I daresay I know a lot more than you do about global warming and our multi-dimensional multiverse. But then I do have a lot more spare time than you, trapped in the rat race, as you are. :-*
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Alan71

I was only a little over a year old or so when that coin was released though (if it entered circulation in January 1973 - I'm assuming it did, as we joined the EEC then).  I'd therefore always known that coin in circulation, and as it was quite common (89 million issued), I had no idea it was a commemorative or what it was for.

One of the numismatic downsides of Brexit is that we shall never see that - or either of the other two EC/EU 50p coins - issued again.  This year's sets of 10 older designs tactfully didn't include any. 

My phone now is just pay-as-you-go.  I put £10 on it in April last year and I still have nearly £4 left on it.  No monthly charge, and I only use WiFi on it, never data.  Helps to restrict the amount of time I spend on my phone.

<k>

#32
This is an example of a 2 pound coin that is text-heavy. The text is given far more space than the portrait of Sir Walter Scott.

Still, I think it is a stylish design, even though I have never liked Scott's works. Is the portrait particularly recognisable, though? What do you think?
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<k>

Another text-heavy 2 pound coin. "VICTORY".
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chrisild

Quote from: <k> on September 16, 2021, 07:46:45 PMThe text is given far more space than the portrait of Sir Walter Scott.

Using a relatively small portrait is fine with me, but there is too much explanatory text in my opinion. I would have assumed that most people know who Sir Walter Scott was. ;)  So the good old "name plus years" (1771–1832) could have been fine. Here is an example, not from the UK though, of such a combo with a small portrait. Did they fill the empty space with what his "jobs" were? Nah. Then again, some of the designs elements of the Scott coin may have been added due to what the Royal Mint requested, see this page.

As for the font(s) used, the designer says, "I wanted to reference some of the Scott lettering I had come across in Abbotsford" – now that I found interesting. Have not found any photos, but I came across this Scotsman article. Quote: "On the canvas of a £2 coin, the words Sir Walter Scott and Novelist, Historian and Poet are inscribed in the same calligraphy seen at Abbotsford's grand entrance and chapel." Cool. :)

Christian

chrisild

Quote from: <k> on September 16, 2021, 07:52:22 PM
Another text-heavy 2 pound coin. "VICTORY".

In this case, there is not too much text, I think, but parts of the text and the pictorial design overlap. Especially the text at the bottom (Victory in Europe Day) and the light beam pattern "interfere" in a strange way. Would have left that line out – you would still have had the big VICTORY and the small VE DAY references. Fortunately the central part of the design is people, and they are even in the foreground. :)

Christian

<k>

Insightful observations, chrisild. It's strange that big text seems to have become a bit of a trend in recent years on UK and related coins.
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radars_teddy

Quote from: chrisild on September 16, 2021, 09:31:40 PM
In this case, there is not too much text, I think, but parts of the text and the pictorial design overlap. Especially the text at the bottom (Victory in Europe Day) and the light beam pattern "interfere" in a strange way. Would have left that line out – you would still have had the big VICTORY and the small VE DAY references. Fortunately the central part of the design is people, and they are even in the foreground. :)

Christian

I think the problem with that design is that the image doesn't depict anthing understandable to the topic of the coin (or anything else).  Without the text, you are completly baffeled as to the meaning and the purpose of the coin.

chrisild

Right, such "abstract" themes are always harder to visualize than somebody's birth or death anniversary, and in this case the cheering people need at least one piece of explanatory text. ;) Interestingly, a £5 coin issued in the same year, commemorating the end of WW2, has a "text only" reverse, see here.

Christian

Figleaf

The paper in the cheerleading lady's hand provides the explanation: VE day. War over in Europe. In that sense, the prominent text VICTORY is odd. The crowd could be leaving a stadium. The concept celebrated here should not have been victory, reducing years of war to a soccer game result, but PEACE IN EUROPE. If that's considered too long, just peace would have passed also.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Well, war and peace was the topic of that (IMO not very nicely designed) £5 coin. ;) But we know that the absence of war is not the same as peace ...

Actually I do believe that the notion of "victory" was the more important one. Peace can also be the result of some armistice or similar agreement. (OK, difficult in the case of Nazi Germany, but in general ...) Victory implies that the enemy/aggressor has been beaten – with the immediate result of "no more war", and then peace.

Christian

radars_teddy

if it was soldiers cheering it would make more sense

agoodall

The image represents the crowds that came out in celebration all over the country, which are the abiding images of VE Day. Without the dates and text at the top and bottom the design wouldn't make much sense but the two together do. I read the large VICTORY as an exclamation of the feelings of the crowd. I think this is one of the better designs the Royal Mint has come up with recently and I'm glad it depicts the joy of the civilian population rather than more military images or plain text like the war and peace £5.

radars_teddy

Quote from: agoodall on September 18, 2021, 01:23:58 AM
I'm glad it depicts the joy of the civilian population rather than more military images or plain text like the war and peace £5.

But it doesn't do that.  It just shows a crowd.  It is just not iconic enough.  Showing soldiers cheering, BTW, is not militry images like Tanks rolling over dead bodies.

pk72

Are these text heavy coins in circulation (in UK)? I asked my friend who was in London for a year, to keep aside for me some of these coins that passed through his hands. Well, he came back empty handed  ;D