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Obverse and reverse

Started by chrisild, July 11, 2008, 04:20:09 PM

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asm

Aidan has his own views on this point which were a cause of a fairly long discussion earlier when it was Aidan v/s all others. However he has set views and will not change.

Amit
"It Is Better To Light A Candle Than To Curse The Darkness"

BC Numismatics

Quote from: africancoins on October 19, 2009, 07:11:56 PM
>>The Asokan capital is on the reverse of the Indian 2 Rupees & 10 Rupees coins.<<

Ha ! Ha ! Very funny.

thanks Mr Paul Baker

Paul,
  It is because the denomination is on the same side as the Asokan capital,which is why it is the reverse.

Whatever they are commemorating is depicted on the obverse.

Aidan.

africancoins

>>It is because the denomination is on the same side as the Asokan capital,which is why it is the reverse.<<

Ha ! Ha ! Very funny.

Do you ever take any note of what the Reserve Bank of India or the world coin catalogues say about this ? Of course not - what do they know. Forgive for taking their lead.

You have not said otherwise - so the coins of 10 Rupees to which you refer must be all 10 Ruppes coins or the normal current pieces ("Information Technology" and "Unity in Diversity"). The latter two type have legend "TEN RUPEES" included on the opposite side to that on which the Asokan Capital - but you are saying that the denomination being on the same side as the Asokan capital on these coins makes the side that includes these two feature together the reverse side. No side includes these two features.

Does your "rule" apply to coins of other countries ? On which side of a Nickel-Brass G.B. 2 Pounds coin of 1986 to 1996 do you see the portrait of the queen ?

Or are your views just here to waste our time and cause confusion to those who may be trying to learn something useful. Do you realise that no one else has the same opinion as you on this subject.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

BC Numismatics

Paul,
  You don't need to be so condescending in this debate about which side is the obverse & which side is the reverse on Indian coins.

The Reserve Bank of India are banknote & coin issuers.They aren't numismatically-minded like we collectors are.

Aidan.

africancoins

>>condescending<<

Really. You were the one who thought you would correct me in the first place. It seems your numismatics is different to mine.

That you have not answered my questions seems to show that you can't.

I won't waste anymore time on this.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

a3v1

Quote from: BC Numismatics on October 20, 2009, 03:52:18 AMIt is because the denomination is on the same side as the Asokan capital,which is why it is the reverse.
So, according to you, the side showing the denomination always is the reverse?
Then what about the Austrian and Greek Euro circulation coins having the denomination on both sides? Do these coins have two reverses?.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

UK Decimal +

One must also remember that there are four UK decimal circulation coins, with mintages of 7,452,100, 37,061,160, 9,306,000 and 26,773,600, all of which are current legal tender, which have no denomination shown at all.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

BC Numismatics

Bill,
  It is obvious in the case of coins of Great Britain,the colonies,& the Dominions about which side is the obverse.

Aidan.

UK Decimal +

Of course it is.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

BC Numismatics

Quote from: a3v1 on October 21, 2009, 03:56:06 PM
So, according to you, the side showing the denomination always is the reverse?
Then what about the Austrian and Greek Euro circulation coins having the denomination on both sides? Do these coins have two reverses?.
Regards,
a3v1

Rob,
  The Austrian & Greek Euro coins also have common reverses as well.

The denominations on the obverses are only the translation of the denomination into Austrian-German & Greek respectively.

Aidan.

Bimat

I noticed a related post here by Oesho here (See reply #9)
Does it apply to modern coins,too?

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

a3v1

Quote from: numismatica on October 24, 2009, 04:48:54 PMI noticed a related post here by Oesho here (See reply #9) Does it apply to modern coins,too?
Aditya,
On modern coins the side showing an identification of the authority that has issued the coin is generally regarded to be the obverse. Though a few may think otherwise. The denomination very often (but not always) is at the other side.
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

Figleaf

The convention Oesho mentions may be quite practical for Indian subcontinent coins, but it's not for European coins. On a coin of Philip II, for instance, the portrait side usually have his name and titles, while the other side very often has his personal motto DOMINVS MIHI ADIVTOR (I have made god my helper), which would be a reference to the higher authority.

My best advice remains to do what is logical for you and to realize that it is not important at all if other people's logic is different.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

africancoins

But, when in the case of the 2 Rupees of Republic of India......  ONE person's logic is contrary to the ONE view of

(i) the normal (according to anyone else I know) rules for modern coins,
(ii) the world coin catalogues (U.S. and German published) AND
(iii) the issuing authority (in this case the Reserve Bank of India)

it is rather difficult for many of us to consider that OBVERSE is open to interpretation in this case.

I want to feel free to use a clearly defined term on this forum - but if I use this particular one again in this exact context then some ONE (if he has the chance) will again tell me I am wrong. In doing so he will be wasting forum time again.

Thanks Mr Paul Baker

tonyclayton

In Mediaeval times the obverse was that on the lower die or pile.  The upper die, or trussel, had the reverse.  As the upper die wore out more quickly than the lower die (as it was the one struck with the hammer) there were normally two trussels issued for each pile.

Nowadays the situation is more confused, as is evident from the discussion that we have been having.  However, if not defined in legal terms as in the USA it is generally held to be the more important side, being the one that in some way declares the country of origin.  Thus UK coins (which often had no denomination, and in early issues no date either) are considered to have the monarch's effigy and the titles on the obverse.

There has been talk of defining it to be the side with the date on.  Clearly this is an impossible definition; the side of the Peace two pounds coin has the date on the edge!

Tony