Author Topic: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro  (Read 6026 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #60 on: April 10, 2019, 04:48:00 PM »




The French language version of the 20 francs coins.

This large images lets you see the mint and privy marks.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #61 on: April 10, 2019, 04:54:21 PM »




The Dutch language version of the 50 francs coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #62 on: April 10, 2019, 04:54:48 PM »




The French language version of the 50 francs coin.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #63 on: April 10, 2019, 04:57:01 PM »
There were no more new coin types for the Belgian franc after this, as the country awaited the transition to the euro.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #64 on: April 10, 2019, 05:00:22 PM »
There was a distinct change in design style, from the mid-1980s onward, away from the Latin gods and cereals, towards spare and functional designs, alongside stylised portraits like those found on some Scandinavian coins.

See: Stylised portraits.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #65 on: April 10, 2019, 05:08:56 PM »




As a schoolboy, I made a brief trip to Blankenberge in Belgium at the age of 11. It was as part of a school trip. I was already fascinated by coins, and this was my first trip abroad. I like the design above, but for some reason I thought it was meant to be a saint with a halo. The head of Ceres also suggested a nun to me.  :D  And no, I wasn't religious either.
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Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #66 on: April 10, 2019, 08:06:19 PM »


This is another fine design. It's obvious that it was modelled on a real person.



See also: Ancient mythology on modern coins.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #67 on: April 10, 2019, 08:19:52 PM »
Don't remember when I first saw one of the "miner" type coins, but it must have been after I had been "exposed" to coins from the nearby Netherlands. :)  Why? Because I had learned that the Dutch would have their queen on every piece - and I thought, aha, so that must be the Belgian king.

Later I learned that this was not even a depiction of some particular person but a sort of generic portrait of a miner. Pretty cool ...

Christian

Offline eurocoin

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #68 on: April 10, 2019, 08:38:09 PM »
Yes the miner coin is ok too although I do not know to what extent mining used to be typically Belgian and how important mines used to be in Belgium. While in school in Belgium, over the years I had to visit 2 different mines so it may have been somewhat significant.

All of this leaves a lot of questions of course. Why Ceres? Why Mercury? Why an olive branch? etc. Surely there must have been some sort of (bad) reasoning behind all that.

Offline chrisild

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #69 on: April 10, 2019, 08:45:04 PM »
Mining was definitely a big industry in Belgium, especially in the greater Liège/Charleroi region. You may remember the Bois du Cazier disaster - to commemorate its 50th anniversary, Belgium issued a €10 collector coin which also featured exactly that miner's head ...

Christian

Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #70 on: April 10, 2019, 08:48:12 PM »
All of this leaves a lot of questions of course. Why Ceres? Why Mercury? Why an olive branch? etc. Surely there must have been some sort of (bad) reasoning behind all that.

As I mentioned, the Walloons were dominant in those days, so they were evidently influenced by the sort of themes found on certain French coins. Of course, France has a Mediterranean region, whilst Belgium does not, so the olive design does look out of place on a Belgian coin.
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #71 on: April 10, 2019, 09:30:28 PM »
That branch on the 20F coin is a laurel twig, according to Schön anyway ...

Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #72 on: April 10, 2019, 09:34:27 PM »
That branch on the 20F coin is a laurel twig, according to Schön anyway ...

Laurel trees are native to the Mediterranean region - not Belgium.
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Offline bart

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #73 on: April 10, 2019, 09:35:57 PM »
During the postwar period (1945-1951) there was a real political struggle in Belgium, called the Royal Question. Due to the way he acted during the war (visiting Hitler, marrying without the parlement's consent) Leopold III ad to stay in exile in Switzerland for a while. In the meantime his brother Charles of Flanders was regent of Belgium.
This was one of the reasons why "allegorical" themes were chosen for the first postwar coinage: to avoid putting the monarch's effigy or monogram on circulation coinage. A royal theme was only used on the silver 100 francs. This was a coin that, together with the silver 20 and 50 francs, saw almost no circulation. As there were notes of 20,50 and 100 francs available, the silver coins were hoarded.
Only in 1964, 13 years after his accession to the throne, was Baudouin's monogram used for the first time on a circulation coin (25 centimes). His effigy was used for the first time in 1969 on the 10 francs coin. Although Elstrom's design of king Baudouin was considered very beautiful, the reverse coat-of-arms design was considered a failure: as the design was very detailed, it proved impossible to get all of the details into the coin, as nickel proved too hard a material for this.

Offline <k>

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Re: Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro
« Reply #74 on: April 10, 2019, 09:39:26 PM »
Thank you, bart - that explains a lot.
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