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Belgian franc: from 1948 until the euro

Started by <k>, April 08, 2019, 08:56:35 PM

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<k>





The 5 francs coins, both versions, were issued in 1948. The common reverse showed the same design as the 1 franc coin: the head of Ceres with cornucopia. The obverse had a similar design to that of the 1 franc coin, but with the relevant denomination.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#16





The French legend version of the 5 francs.

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Both the 1 and 5 franc coins were made of copper-nickel. They were respectively 21 mm and 24 mm in diameter.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






In 1949 the two linguistic versions of the 20 francs coins were issued. The common reverse featured the head of Mercury and the caduceus.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse design of the 20 francs with French legend.

Lion with Belgian constitution.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse design of the 20 francs with Dutch legend.

NOTE: Some think that Flemish is a language; others say that it is only a dialect of Dutch.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The reverse design of the 50 francs showed Mercury, exactly as on the 20 francs design.

The obverse design of the 50 francs (above) was the same as the 20 francs, apart from the different denomination.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse design of the 50 francs with French legend.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The 20 and 50 francs coins were made of silver (.835).



So far the designs have been rather Latin in influence, such as you would expect to find on the coins of France or Italy at that time. This reflects the greater political and economic influence of the French-speaking Walloons in those days. In later decades the Flemings would become more powerful within Belgium.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The common reverse of the silver 100 francs coin featured the heads of Kings Leopold I, Leopold II, Albert I and Leopold III facing left.

This was a standard circulation coin, first issued in 1948.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse design featured the crowned coat of arms. Above you see the Dutch language version.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse design featured the crowned coat of arms. Above you see the French language version.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The silver coinage ceased production after 1955.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>





Copper-nickel 25 centimes coins replaced the 20 centimes in 1964. The 25 centimes coins were later discontinued in 1975.

The new coin was 16 mm in diameter. The common reverse showed King Baudouin's crowned monogram.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>






The obverse of the Dutch language version.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.