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'Strike your own coin' programmes.

Started by BC Numismatics, October 10, 2009, 10:47:33 AM

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BC Numismatics

Here's a section that will stir some interest.It is about the 'strike your own coin' programmes offered by mints.

So far,I know that the Royal Australian Mint did allow you to strike your own $1 coin,& the Turkish Mint in Ankara allowed you to strike your own 1,000,000 Lira (prior to the 2005 currency reform in Turkey).

Does anyone know of any other 'strike your own coin' programmes? Does the Royal Australian Mint do a 'strike your own coin' programme at the various coin fairs that they bring along a portable coining press to?

Aidan.

chrisild

All I know is that the KNM (Royal Dutch Mint) does that from time to time. Well, earlier this year, children were allowed to mint €2 coins during the Open Mint Day ...

Christian

BC Numismatics

Christian,
  Was that for free,or was there a fee?

Aidan.

chrisild

Don't know - I may be childish at times but did not qualify as a kid on that day. :) Since the idea behind this CoinKids program is to get young people interested in coins, charging a fee (beyond the two euro for the €2 blank) would not be the best thing to do. But I did not really pay attention ...

Christian

Figleaf

I hammered my own "Viking coin" at the Yorkshire museum. Hammering your own is an eye opener. Many people can't get it right the first time. It requires strength, precision and even an amount of fearlessness, because the hammer goes right at your hand with good speed and the mounted die is the only thing that wil stop it. Doing it once or twice is OK, doing that the whole day is nothing short of amazing.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

Quote from: Figleaf on October 10, 2009, 04:41:28 PM
I hammered my own "Viking coin" at the Yorkshire museum. Hammering your own is an eye opener. Many people can't get it right the first time. It requires strength, precision and even an amount of fearlessness, because the hammer goes right at your hand with good speed and the mounted die is the only thing that wil stop it. Doing it once or twice is OK, doing that the whole day is nothing short of amazing.

Peter

I think I have one from Jorvik too - somewhere!  Another "strike your own" hammered coin-like object I have is a private commemorative medal produced by Paul Withers, whom many of us know, in imitation of a mediaeval sterling.  I'll dig it out and scan it later - I thought it quite clever.  Not sure if it really was hand-struck, though.


eurocoin

#6
Interesting topic. I had been wondering whether other countries allowed the general public to mint legal tender coins. I did know about the UK and Australia but hadn't heard about the option in Turkey before.

As an update to this topic: in the UK collectors now also have the option to strike their own coin at the Royal Mint Experience. The coin they can mint differs. Sometimes it is a standard circulating coins, other times a commemorative coin or collectors coin.

QuoteAll I know is that the KNM (Royal Dutch Mint) does that from time to time. Well, earlier this year, children were allowed to mint €2 coins during the Open Mint Day ...

I participated in the Coin Kids program at Royal Dutch Mint in 2009 and we were not allowed to strike a 2 euro coin. Instead we had to strike a medal with a sumo wrestler on it to commemorate 400 years of friendship between the Netherlands and Japan. As far as I know there has never been a possibility for the general public to strike legal tender coins in the Netherlands.

Of course there are first strike ceremonies in the Netherlands where VIP's who do not work at the mint get the chance to strike a coin, and at the end of 2013 there was a closed dealer's conference at Royal Dutch Mint where coin dealers were allowed to strike their own 2 euro coin.

QuoteDon't know - I may be childish at times but did not qualify as a kid on that day. :) Since the idea behind this CoinKids program is to get young people interested in coins, charging a fee (beyond the two euro for the €2 blank) would not be the best thing to do. But I did not really pay attention ...

All times when I participated, adults who asked nicely were also allowed on the program. If I remember correctly participation costed 5 or 10 euros.