Author Topic: Hungary, 10 forint 2006  (Read 6451 times)

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Hungary, 10 forint 2006
« on: October 07, 2009, 12:23:59 AM »
I was given these a few days ago (by my local pub, they're starting to know me).   

Two of them, both the same and both 2006 (which makes the scanning easier!).

About the size of a UK 10p,   If I remember correctly, anything with Magyar is Hungary.  10 forint.   Am I right, and what would the approx face value be compared with the £ (or €)?

Many thanks,

Bill.

++ Sorry about the poor image, I've had to reload my scanner software and will have to re-do all the settings to get them right again.   This saved as .bmp and I had to re-save as .jpg after I'd reduced the size - but I promise to get it right again!
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 11:56:03 AM by Figleaf »
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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andyg

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2009, 12:25:20 AM »
They are indeed from Hungary,

10 Forint = £0.034

Did they get them in change, Bill?
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 12:39:42 AM by andyg »

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2009, 12:37:46 AM »
They'd been put aside from the till and were given to me because they know I'm interested in coins.

I often call in there after shopping and they've seen me checking my change.   But those two coins totalling 7p - they seem to be too good a quality for that.

Bill.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 12:48:55 AM by bilnic »
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2009, 12:58:37 AM »
The heraldry of this republic can only be explained by its recent history. It is full of feudal symbols, but it was the coat of arms before communism. As communism was swept away, it was regarded as a symbol of resistance and acceptable in that sense. In fact, Hungary could have chosen to use uncrowned arms, as those were used by Lajos Kossuth after 1848.

The right side of the arms is a Byzantine inheritance from 1190. It shows three hills, the middle one crowned, surmounted by a double cross, as used in the Carolingian empire. This was the arms of Hungary until the middle ages. The left side is the arms of the house of Árpád. Hungary's first king, István I, came from this family. He is better known as Saint Steven.

The crown on the arms is traditionally known as the crown of Saint Steven. Although the saint-king never wore it, as scientific analysis dates it as 12th century, it is an accepted relic of the saint (as is his right hand). When Hungary fell to the Habsburgs, the crown became an Austrian possession, only to revert to Hungary at independence. At the end of the second world war, the crown was transferred to Fort Knox in the US and returned to Hungary in 1978. It is now in the Hungarian parliament building.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2009, 01:09:08 AM »
Thanks Peter, I like to see heraldry on coins; I think that it seems to give the coinage some importance, and it's nice to know what it means.

Bill.
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Re: Recently received
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2009, 01:43:56 AM »
I was certain that I could get a better picture.

Let's see how this looks.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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translateltd

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2009, 01:44:33 AM »
They'd been put aside from the till and were given to me because they know I'm interested in coins.

I often call in there after shopping and they've seen me checking my change.   But those two coins totalling 7p - they seem to be too good a quality for that.

Bill.

According to www.xe.com/ucc, there are currently 288 forint to the pound, so 3.4p for 10 forint is about right.


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Re: Recently received
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2009, 02:30:52 AM »
To show how I like to follow things up
From Wikipedia, where it also says that  1 forint = 100 fillér

Coins of the Hungarian forint
 
In 1946, coins were introduced in denominations of 2, 10, 20 fillérs and 1, 2, 5 forints. The silver 5 forint was reissued only in the next year, later it was withdrawn from circulation. 5 and 50 fillérs coins were issued in 1948. In 1967, a 5 forint coin was reintroduced, followed by a 10 forint in 1971 and 20 forint in 1982.

In 1992, a new series of coins was introduced with denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and (a somewhat different, 500‰ silver) 200 forint. Production of the 2 and 5 fillér coins ceased in 1992, with all fillér coins withdrawn from circulation by 1999. From 1996, a bicolor 100 forint coin was minted to replace the 1992 version, since the latter was considered too big and ugly, and could be easily mistaken with the 20 forint coin.

Silver 200 forint coins were withdrawn in 1998 (due to their nominal value getting too low compared to their precious metal content), the 1 and 2 forint coins remained in circulation until 29 February 2008. A new 200 forint coin made of base metal alloy was introduced on 15 June 2009.


So, if anyone is watching here for information, we are pleased to oblige.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2009, 11:17:37 AM »
In fact, Hungary could have chosen to use uncrowned arms

Poland did roughly the same thing: When the country became an independent republic after WW1, they used the white eagle with a crown and a cross. In the mid-1920s the cross was removed. During the People's Republic the eagle had neither a cross nor a crown. In 1989/90, when the People's Republic became a (democratic) republic again, the crown - but not the cross - came back.

As for the Hungarian 200 forint bi-met coin, that is discussed http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,1706.0.html here. The corresponding 200 HUF note will cease to be legal tender in about a month (16 Nov) but can be redeemed until 2029.

Christian

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Re: Recently received
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2009, 11:43:27 AM »
Surprising how an 'everyday' coin, accepted in error, can raise so much interest.

Thanks for the replies.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Hungary, 10 forint 2006
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2009, 12:50:05 PM »
Well, I did find it peculiar that they even got, and gave you, two of these. :)  Then I find the coat of arms interesting, partly because of the lop-sided cross, partly because of the three mountain tops with the double cross which also appear in the CoA (and on some coins) of Slovakia. And last but not least, the language is so different from what their Indo-European neighbors use ...

Christian