Author Topic: Comments on Use of the Crowned and Uncrowned Effigies in the Commonwealth  (Read 17853 times)

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Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Comments on Use of the Crowned and Uncrowned Effigies in the Commonwealth
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2010, 10:39:46 PM »
I happened to notice this in Encyclopaedia Britannica:-

In the 20th century, coins of the colonies continued in general to show a crowned bust of the monarch; those of the self-governing Commonwealth powers exchanged a crowned for an uncrowned bust. New Zealand issues, with Maori designs prominent, began only in 1933. Indian and Pakistani coinages, each bilingual with English, grew out of the imperial Indian coinage, the British sovereign's head being replaced in India by pictorial designs and in Muslim Pakistan by calligraphic and symbolic devices.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Comments on Use of the Crowned and Uncrowned Effigies in the Commonwealth
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2010, 10:58:15 PM »
Were the crowned and uncrowned portraits generally designed by different or the same people?

Peter
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translateltd

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Re: Comments on Use of the Crowned and Uncrowned Effigies in the Commonwealth
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2010, 11:00:35 PM »
Were the crowned and uncrowned portraits generally designed by different or the same people?

Peter

Different for Eliz II.  I'd have to hunt up some references for earlier monarchs.



Offline gerard974

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Andrew
If all these coins are in your collection congratulation

Offline <k>

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I know that Percy Metcalfe designed the effigy which is the third from the left. Can I also assume that the second effigy from the left and the one on the far right are also designed by him and are simply variations of his original design?

To remind you where these were used (from left to right):

1) UK

2) Australia, British Honduras, British Guyana, British West Africa, Canada, Ceylon, Cyprus, East Africa, India, Jamaica, Jersey, Mauritius, Newfoundland, Sailana, South Africa, Straits Settlements

3) Australia (1934 2/-), Fiji, Mauritius, New Zealand, Southern Rhodesia
(These all struck after 1932)

4) Australia (1927 2/-)
« Last Edit: April 20, 2011, 11:53:50 AM by coffeetime »
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Offline andyg

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The coin on the left has the initails BM - I ought to know who this is for but I'll have to look it up.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2011, 07:54:39 PM by andyg »
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Offline <k>

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The coin on the left has the initails BM - I ought to know who this is for but I'll have to look it up.

Bertram Mackennal - so that's number 1, the UK one only?
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Offline andyg

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Bertram Mackennal - so that's number 1, the UK one only?

That's him.  He also designed the equivalent commonwealth portrait - No.2.
No idea on No.4 (Australian 2/- 1927 only)
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translateltd

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2 and 4 are both Mackennal, according to Rennik's Aussie catalogue.


Offline andyg

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here is the Octorino pattern,



by Huth also.
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Offline andyg

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And here is the 4 shilling,



One I'd forgotten about! (thanks Martin)
Martin is probably right - the portrait does look four shilling size.
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Offline Afrasi

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I was told by a friend the mainland and the dominions, where the British came as settlers (Canada, Australia, New Zealand etc), used uncrowned coinage, while the colonies had to use crowned coins.
Another meaning I did hear, it has to do with having an own parliament. But this also correspondents in many ways to the first statement.

Offline tonyclayton

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here is the Octorino pattern,

(image snipped)

by Huth also.

I saw no image on my first attempt!  It loaded when I first posted this.

Here is a better copy, courtesy of Spink, as I recall

The problem is that the denomination does not fit into my website scheme!!

Offline <k>

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According to Numismaster, Belize has issued circulation 1c and 25c coins dated 2007 that bear this portrait: the crowned effigy by Cecil Thomas. The last example of this portrait that I can find from another country is the very scarce Hong Kong circulation 10c coin dated 1980.
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Offline Figleaf

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Maybe the use of the portraits was not so much established policy as someone's idea that it would be neat. The someone in case would be powerful, not the king (I don't see Elizabeth second-guessing her father) and most probably not a politician. I wonder if a deputy master of the mint played a role in establishing the hierarchy.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 31, 2013, 12:19:41 PM by <k> »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.