Author Topic: Sets where the head of state appeared on some but not all obverses  (Read 1016 times)

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Offline chrisild

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Re: Sets where the head of state appeared on some but not all obverses
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2018, 08:51:03 PM »
In Greece under the monarchy, only the coins of 50 lepta and above carried the King's portrait.

I wonder where and why this sort of split originated?

The 10 and 20 lepta coins issued before the military regime (King Paul and King Constantine) had a central hole; maybe that was the reason? But as you know and show :) it is fairly common, at least in some monarchies, to not use the royal portrait on low denomination pieces.

By the way, in 1973 Greece issued two different 20 lepta coins. Both have the big "20" and the olive twig, but the earlier one (issued when Greece was formally a kingdom) has the usual phoenix/soldier/1967 date design. The one you posted is from the "republic" (same regime of the colonels but sans king).

As for Sweden by the way, the highest denomination coin is the 10 kronor piece. And that does show the king. But in my opinion, both a portrait and a personal monogram refer to a person, while the three crowns refer to the country ...

Christian