Author Topic: heads and tale  (Read 3645 times)

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Offline Figleaf

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heads and tale
« on: March 01, 2010, 12:19:56 AM »
I spotted a pile of large silver coins in the window of a Rome money changer, covered with grey and brown. Most were the usual suspects, but two were not yet in the collection. A treatment with a soft eraser took off the dust and fat of decades and out came a nice coin. It is full of hairline scratches and I didn't catch all of the dirt, but the seller wouldn't have recognized it. I like the shrunken head collection. ;)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2010, 12:38:59 AM »
The other coin I found came out worse. There's a milky white spot on the king's face that won't disappear. I find the design a bit uninspired too.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline bart

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2010, 08:20:36 PM »
You're right about the 500 francs coin, Peter! I also find the "5 portraits as a map of Belgium" very appealing.

These coins were intended to be silver, but they were struck during the Hunt-silver crisis. As silver was much too expensive, the government decided to struck these in copper-nickel, plated with silver. The layers are composed of 0.835 silver and make 20 % of the coin.

About the other coin: well... it's the king's portrait... and it's the king's initial... and that's it!

These coins could be purchased at nominal value. These were also struck in proof-like and those were sold at the double of face value. (The 500 francs in proof-like were struck in 0.510 silver instead of plaqué-silver)

Bart
« Last Edit: March 11, 2010, 07:33:28 AM by bart »

Offline Figleaf

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2010, 09:07:36 PM »
These coins were intended to be silver, but they were struck during the Hunt-silver crisis. As silver was much too expensive, the government decided to struck these in copper-nickel, plated with silver. The layers are composed of 0.835 silver and make 20 % of the coin.

It took a while to sink in, but I think that explains the white spot on the second coin: it's the copper-nickel coming through. :( Thanks, Bart. BTW, I got almost all the discoloration off the first coin now. It looks even better now that I know that it was issued at face.

I read the signature below the king's head as Ant. Luyckx. Is he related to Luc Luyckx?

Peter
« Last Edit: March 10, 2010, 11:09:05 PM by Figleaf »
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2010, 09:58:57 PM »
You're right about the 500 francs coin, Peter! I also find the "5 portraits as a map of Belgium" very appealing.


I never spotted the parallel between the layout of the effigies and the map on the other side - very clever!

Offline chrisild

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2010, 11:17:19 PM »
Aren't there two version of the coins? (I mean, apart from Dutch and French.) Seems that one is silver-plated Cu-Ni, and another one - the proof piece - is Ag510. By the way, Luc Luycx has no K in his name. But of course the two could still be related ...

Christian

Offline bart

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Re: heads and tale
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2010, 06:20:23 PM »
Quote from: Figleaf
I read the signature below the king's head as Ant. Luyckx. Is he related to Luc Luyckx?

The same thought came up in my mind. It's until chrisild noticed that Luc Luycx' name was written without a K that I noticed it.
Luyckx (with K) is a common name in Flanders, so I wrote Luc Luycx' name wrong for years.

About the 250 francs coin: Antoon Luyckx ( a known sculptor) designed only the obverse. The royal monogram on the reverse was designed by Marc Severin, while the crown above the B-monogram was designed by the heraldry-expert André Toussaint. (ref. "De Belgische Frank", encyclopedia of the Belgian circulation issues)
Even of these coins there are 2 versions, apart from the Dutch and French legends: the regular issues have a reeded edge, while the proof-like issues have 25 stars on the edge.

Quote from: Figleaf
It took a while to sink in, but I think that explains the white spot on the second coin: it's the copper-nickel coming through.

Only the first coin (500 francs) is plated. The second coin was struck in 0.835 silver (and 0.165 copper)

Bart