Mountains and volcanoes on coins

Started by Galapagos, September 04, 2009, 03:00:11 AM

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Galapagos

Chile.jpg

Chile - 1 peso, 1828.


Philippines.jpg

Philippines - 1 peso, 1905.


Mt Redoubt.jpg

Photo of Mt Redoubt, Alaska, blowing its top.

Figleaf

There are a few types of Mexican  circulation coins with a pyramid in the foreground and Popocatepetl in the background. Mexicans hold the Popocatepetl in awe, even though it is dormant. When I flew past it, a few years ago, the Mexican passengers all stormed to one side of the plane to see the top, which is usually in the clouds. I could feel how the pilot had trouble controlling the plane ...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Figleaf

#2
Found another one. This is San Marino KM 205, 20 lire 1987. It is highly doubtful that it circulated, of course. The three volcanoes may be an allusion to the San Marino coat of arms, but on the coat of arms, there are three mountains topped by towers with a giant feather sticking out (KM erroneously calls them smoking towers).

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

#3
Quote from: Figleaf on September 05, 2009, 01:58:06 AM
There are a few types of Mexican  circulation coins with a pyramid in the foreground and Popocatepetl in the background.

I posted a topic on one of those coins here:-

My Favourite Mexican Circulation Coin Design.


Quote from: Figleaf on September 05, 2009, 01:58:06 AM
Mexicans hold the Popocatepetl in awe, even though it is dormant.

I deliberately restricted myself to smoking volcanoes here, as they're more spectacular. Apparently Manuel Noriega, the former dictator of Panama, was said to have had a liking for having certain of his political foes taken up in a helicopter and dropped down a live volcano. A bit James Bondish, but I suppose it's nice to know that someone CARES that much.


<k>

#4
Slovenia 50ct.jpg

Triglav, the highest mountain in Slovenia.


Slovakia_1_cent.jpg

Kriváň, a symbolic mountain in the High Tatras of Slovakia.




Kriváň on the 20 halierov of Slovakia's old coinage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

See how the Slovaks want to confuse us all, by using the name "Slovensko"? Fortunately we Germans were clever enough to use names for the two countries that make the differentiation much easier. ;D  While you constantly mix Slovekia and Slovania up, we have "Slowakei" and "Slowenien".

But it is interesting indeed how similar not only the country names (which both refers to Slavs) are. Even the flags and coats of arms are almost lookalikes.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e6/Flag_of_Slovakia.svg/450px-Flag_of_Slovakia.svg.png
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f0/Flag_of_Slovenia.svg/450px-Flag_of_Slovenia.svg.png

What helps is the alphabet. Just as you can easily tell where _Es_tonia, _La_tvia and _Li_thuania are, by going from north to south alphabetically, you can do that with Slov_a_kia and Slov_e_nia too.

Back to mountains ... here are three pieces from Switzerland, designed by Stephan Bundi. Not actually circulation coins, but they were available at face.

Christian

bart

#6
And on these coins the Himalaya is depicted: 2 Tibetan 5 sho coins, a mountain with 2 suns and a mountain with moon and sun.

andyg

No fair!

Bart's coin has three mountains - mine only two :'(



A type I was completely unaware of until recently.  (thanks Afrasi ;))
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Bimat

Here's one Indian coin showing mountains..



Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Bimat

Back to mountains on Swiss coins:

2004 : Matterhorn



2005 : Jungfrau



2006 : Piz Bernina



Aditya

It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

chrisild

Here is a Libertad silver bullion piece from Mexico (image: worldcoingallery.com). In the background you see the volcanoes Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl.



Christian

<k>

#11





Here's a Mexican 20 centavos coin.

You can see those same mountains/volcanoes on the reverse of the coin, also The Pyramid of the Sun.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Ukrainii Pyat

Quote from: chrisild on March 05, 2011, 11:07:49 AM
Here is a Libertad silver bullion piece from Mexico (image: worldcoingallery.com). In the background you see the volcanoes Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl.



Christian

There are mountains in the background also?  I only saw the ones on the Angel of Liberty :o ;D
Донецк Украина Donets'k Ukraine

chrisild

Hehe, that angel, and also the pyramid on the 20 centavos coin, I have seen myself. But while I actually went all the way up to the pyramid top (March equinox zoo ;D ), I have only seen the Angel from the street level. No mountains up there, hehe, and none in the background anyway ...

Several US state quarters have "mountain" scenes too. Here are three of them; if you need more mountains, check the Nebraska and Washington SQs out for example. Images of the NH, CA and CO quarters are below; for high-resolution images click on the state names.



New Hampshire (2000): Old Man of the Mountain. Three years later the coin design would have been a different one as parts of the rock fell off in 2003. - California (2005): The "Half Dome" in Yosemite NP. - Colorado (2006): Longs Peak.

Christian

translateltd

Then there's Japan's Tsukuba Expo '85 coin, with a stylised representation of Mt Tsukuba on one side and the Expo logo on the other (I assume the triangular symbol is meant to be vaguely reminiscent of a mountain, too).

I moved to Tsukuba in 1986 after all the fuss had died down so got to enjoy the shiny new steel-and-glass shopping centres and exhibition buildings without having to cope with an international Expo at the same time ...

(Images "borrowed" from eBay since my own example is locked away somewhere)