Author Topic: Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK  (Read 14540 times)

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Offline UK Decimal +

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Re: Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2009, 05:48:48 PM »
I'd already tried some searches on the net before asking here.

I've also come up with a reference to 'Letters Patent 1971' regarding demonetisation of pre-decimal coinage, but can't find any detail about this.

Also involved could be the double-florin, only issued from 1887 to 1890, worth 4/- (four shillings) which would make it a forerunner of the present 20p.

Bill.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2009, 07:42:46 PM by bilnic »
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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translateltd

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Re: Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2009, 10:07:02 PM »
I made this table for my own reference from various sources some years ago - the fact that it doesn't have any reference to Maundy denoms (apart from the notion that the Maundy 3d (now 3p) may still be current) suggests they haven't been officially demonetised.  Also the fact that the Maundy coins had their nominal value multiplied by 2.4 in February 1971 suggests they're all still "current" as decimal denominations:

Sterling   
Farthing (copper)   31 December 1869
Farthing (bronze)   1 January 1961
Halfpenny (copper)   31 December 1869?
Halfpenny (bronze)   1 August 1969
Penny (copper)   31 December 1869
Penny (bronze)   31 August 1971
Threepence (silver)   still current as Maundy?
Threepence (nickel-brass)   31 August 1971
Sixpence   30 June 1980 (as 2½ new pence)
Shilling   1 January 1991 (as 5 new pence)
Florin   1 July 1993 (as 10 new pence)
Halfcrown   1 January 1970
Crown   still “current” as £5 rather than 25p
   
Decimal   
Half penny   December 1984
Penny   still current
Two pence   still current
Five pence (large)   1 January 1991
Five pence (small)   still current
Ten pence (large)   1 July 1993
Ten pence (small)   still current
Twenty pence   still current
Fifty pence (large)   28 February 1998
Fifty pence (small)   still current
Pound   still current
Two pounds   still current

BC Numismatics

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Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK.
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2009, 10:26:25 PM »
Martin,
  The old Maundy Groat is still classed as legal tender for 4p. as opposed to 4d..

It is interesting to know that both the Maundy 1d. & 2d. still have legal tender status as 1p. & 2p. coins.

Have a read here; http://www.maundymoney.info .

Aidan.

translateltd

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Re: Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK.
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2009, 10:44:02 PM »
Martin,
  The old Maundy Groat is still classed as legal tender for 4p. as opposed to 4d..


Yup.  As I said above, the Maundy 3d now counts as 3p, so it kinda follows that the same formula applies to the 1, 2 and 4 pence in the series.


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Undemonetized pre-decimal coins
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2009, 12:22:47 AM »
Regarding ‘not demonetised pre-decimal’, you will have noticed from other topics that I'm convinced that the 'silver' 3d, 4d, 4/- and 5/- were never demonetised.

I have been asking in this Forum whether anyone has any information on this.   I consider that they are still 'valid' (I won't say legal tender which might be a different question) because they were no longer in regular circulation at decimalisation and were therefore excluded from demonetisation by omission.   I am loath to approach the Royal Mint on the subject as it might stir them into action which would be a pity.   The question is academic anyway.

When I mentioned the coins that I grew up with, I meant just a few as examples without spending a lot of money on them.   Just about the time of decimalisation I had a pretty good collection of most of the various coins that were in general use at about that time, but I think that they were lost following the sudden death of my mother, although I am hoping that I may have a few in the loft and next time I go up there ...

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

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Undemonetized pre-decimal coins
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2009, 12:35:23 AM »
Since it's academic, I'm sure the Mint wouldn't bother stirring themselves into action. It'd take an act of Parliament, anyway, if they weren't already demonetised.

It might take a lot of time, but why not try Googling "Hansard UK"?

I tried "hansard uk demonetisation" and got, as one example:-

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1968/may/14/halfpennies

Obviously you'd have to be more specific as to your denomination, year, etc.

So far, all my enquiries have drawn a blank.   It is difficult to find information about something that (probably) didn't happen.

But I think that it is a subject worthy of discussion here.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.

andyg

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Undemonetized pre-decimal coins
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2009, 12:49:57 AM »
This is from the 'News of the World' July 25th, 1971

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Undemonetized pre-decimal coins
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2009, 12:56:40 AM »
Andy, that's the first I've seen in print!

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

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Re: Legal Tender and Valid Currency in the UK
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2009, 05:18:03 AM »
Referring to Andy's message above, I've asked the News of the World if they have any back-up information on the last three paragraphs of their article.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.