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UK Pattern 50p

Started by Galapagos, August 20, 2009, 08:54:00 PM

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Galapagos



Left: Pattern 50 pence.  Right: Issued 50 pence.

Image copyright Royal Mint Museum.


Here is a pattern (on the left) of one of the designs considered for the first UK decimal 50p, by the numismatic artist Christopher Ironside. It depicts the Royal Arms. Eventually Ironside's version of Britannia was chosen instead. However, visitors to the Royal Mint Museum often express their admiration for the pattern piece. I personally think it was preferable to the Britannia design.

Figleaf

Was this same design used on the round pound?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Galapagos

Yes, it's similar to what appeared on the 1983 pound coin (the designs varied by year), and the shield of arms now appears on the newly designed pound since 2008. This 50p design looks a lot smarter than the pound design to my eyes.

tonyclayton

To be honest I far prefer Britannia, and it is a pity that she has been retired from our coinage (for the moment)

Prosit

#4
Brit.jpg


I have to agree with Tony I love Britannia. She is such a hottie  ;D

I am including an image as an example (not a 50 P).

While "Real" coin collectors may scoff at my "Coin", I love the design  :-*

Dale

translateltd

Count me in among the Britannia fans.  She was good on the 50p but I still think the standing representations on the Edward VII florin and British Trade Dollar are unsurpassed.


Galapagos

#6
UK Version 4.jpg


UK Version 2.jpg


UK Version 3.jpg


Some more versions I photocopied at the National Archives.

Apologies for the poor quality.

Galapagos

#7
UK Version 5.jpg


UK Version 6.jpg

These two designs are clearly related to the original pattern.

chrisild

Ah yes, the glorious days when digits would indicate the value. Tempi passati ... But thanks for finding those designs and sketches and making them available! I prefer the pattern piece, or version 6. The other have too many decorative elements around the main design.

Too bad that the £1 coin was not planned yet when that series was designed. Britannia could have been on that small coin, and still be visible in detail, while the CoA (that the £1 is too small for) would have been great on the big 50p coin.

By the way, what vegetable replaced the Welsh dragon in version 4 ??

Christian

Galapagos

Quote from: chrisild on August 23, 2009, 10:46:16 PM

By the way, what vegetable replaced the Welsh dragon in version 4 ??

Christian

It's called a leek, and it's one of the Welsh national emblems. The daffodil is another. On one occasion at work, a proud Welsh colleague, Tom Williams, pinned a leek to his office wall on St David's Day. English was Tom's second language. His mother lived her whole life in Wales without ever needing to learn English.

chrisild

Quote from: Christoph van der Ackerhütte on August 24, 2009, 02:53:56 AM
It's called a leek, and it's one of the Welsh national emblems. The daffodil is another.

Ah, did not know that, thanks. Guess I would have found it a little strange to see a leek on a coin, in a series of pieces that otherwise depicts national flowers ...

Christian

Figleaf

I found very old references to the red dragon, dating back to the times of the Saxon invasions. I think that if King Arthur existed, he would have had a red dragon standard carried with him in battle. No mention of all the other symbols in old texts, though lesser lords like to use hawks, assorted pussycats and crosses. As far as I can remember the first mention of leek as a symbol of (the prince of) Wales is somewhere in Shakespeare's work.

I wonder if "national" flowers and animals occur outside Britain and the US. I think the most appropriate national animal for the Netherlands would have been the frog, while the nettle, symbol of where free men can still urinate in fresh air, would be an appropriate national plant. Mmmm. Maybe its best we don't have such symbols...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

I think the leek puts in a discreet appearance on the last issue of British 6ds, in amongst the other national flowers of the British Isles.

<k>

#13


Here is the pattern 50p (left) next to the issued 50p.

Image copyright Royal Mint Museum.


See also: Do you prefer Ironside's issued standard 50p design or his rejected one ?.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#14



In 2013, the rejected design was minted on a circulating 50 pence coin.

It was issued to commemorate the birth centenary of Christopher Ironside.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.