Gibraltar 1988: adopted and unadopted designs by Alfred Ryman

Started by <k>, May 04, 2017, 01:09:49 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

<k>

Gibraltar issued its first circulating decimal coinage back in 1988. The territory commissioned the Pobjoy Mint to produce its coins. The designs were produced by local artist, Alfred Ryman. Below you see his signature, which appeared on his design sketches.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

One penny.  A Barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara).
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Two pence.  The Europa Point Lighthouse.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Five pence.  A macaque monkey (Macaca sylvanus) - known locally as "the Barbary ape". It is surrounded by a motif of candytuft, Gibraltar's "national" flower.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Ten pence.  The Moorish Castle, with the Mediaeval Tower of Homage.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Twenty pence.  Statue of "Our Lady of Europe" at the Cathedral of St. Mary the Crowned, Gibraltar.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Fifty pence.  A candytuft, Gibraltar's floral emblem.  The actual coin was NOT minted "upside-down".
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

One pound.  Gibraltar's coat of arms.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Two pounds.  The cannon of the Ince battery.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Five pounds.  Hercules and his pillars.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

In 1989 Gibraltar issued a circulating commemorative pound coin, honouring the 150th anniversary of the first Gibraltar coin.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Here is a sketch for a one royal coin. The design is familiar - but was it ever issued as a "royal" ?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

This sketch was meant to show the equivalent of a gold sovereign: a Tarik. It depicts Moorish leader Tarik Ibn-Zeyad. The name Gibraltar is a corruption of Gibel-Tarik, meaning "Tarik's Mount".  Tarik is the one who had the Moorish Castle built in Gibraltar.

The British pointed out that this design resembled George and the Dragon somewhat, so they advised Gibraltar against using it. Would anybody really mistake Tarik for Saint George?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Nelson and HMS Victory appear in this sketch of a proposed platinum Tarik coin, which was never issued.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Here are some official descriptions issued by Gibraltar at the time.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.