Author Topic: Civic copper of Khoy / lion & star dated 1190 AH  (Read 81 times)

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Offline saro

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Civic copper of Khoy / lion & star dated 1190 AH
« on: March 24, 2021, 10:04:00 AM »
21mm / 16,75g / thickness : 5mm
the star on the lion's body isn't a countermark but seems to belong to the reverse die.
dated 1190 AH (this coin is known for both 1190  1191)
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Civic copper of Khoy / lion & star dated 1190 AH
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2021, 11:22:57 PM »
The mints that made civic tokens are described as pretty simple. I cannot think of a simple way to apply that star other than with a punch. Remember that the star would have to be en relief to produce an incuse star.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline saro

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Re: Civic copper of Khoy / lion & star dated 1190 AH
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2021, 09:01:58 AM »
I cannot think of a simple way to apply that star other than with a punch.

However, technically that seems very possible. If it had been a countermark, it would inevitably punched in more or less random places, but it is present exactly in the same place on the  the lion's body on all the coins that I could see... (S.Album, Alaedini, British museum, Zeno...)
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Civic copper of Khoy / lion & star dated 1190 AH
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2021, 11:00:18 AM »
Yes, I gathered as much.

The lion's body is dug out on the die. To create the star, the engraver would have to do a difficult job for a machine by hand.

The closest to this effect are the edge legends on the 1797 "cartwheel" coins. Consider that they were seen as a trade secret and highly innovative in 1797 and the technique was to my knowledge not used beyond the British Colonial empire.

I tried to dream up a way to do it in a non-mechanised mint, with marks on the coin and the anvil in order to put the coin in exactly the right position and a contraption around the punch that fits on the anvil. First, the punch would flatten part of the other side of the coin - maybe using the punch before the die could solve that. Second, the whole operation would seriously diminish the capacity of the mint but it wouldn't do anyone any good.

Mysterious.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.