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What's your wish list for new national circulation sets?

Started by <k>, November 03, 2016, 06:42:37 PM

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<k>

If we look at world national circulation coinages, we see that some countries do not have one at all:

Countries without their own currency


Some countries issue only banknotes and no coins.

Some countries use only the coins and banknotes of other countries.

Montenegro, for instance, uses the euro.


Some countries actually issue their own coins but use somebody else's banknotes.

That is the case in Timor Leste and Zimbabwe, and there are other cases in Latin America.

Belarus use to issue only banknotes, but now it has its own coins.


To see who has recently issued a new set, see this topic:

Major New Circulation Sets of the 21st Century


To see who is planning to release a new set, see this topic:

Planned Major Changes to World Circulation Sets


Then we have coin sets whose designs may be unsatisfactory in some way.

That is more subjective, though, and it all comes down to the view of the collector.


Here are some sets whose designs I thought were poorly unified:

Circulation sets with poorly unified design

Usually that happens because a set is not released all at once.

The coins and therefore designs are spread out over a few years,.

So they end up looking odd.


Then there may be other reasons why you dislike a coin set.

Maybe you dislike all the designs.

Maybe you think it has the wrong themes for the country.

Maybe its coins are too large or too small.


Post your thoughts on what you would like to see issued or changed.
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<k>

On the design side, I find the Madagascar set to be old-fashioned and badly unified. Half the designs stem from the 1960s and the rest from the late 1970s onwards. I would like to see a new set that includes some of Madagascar's unique wildlife, particularly the lemur.

Liberia is talking about issuing coins again. If so, they need a complete new design series, not just the tired old designs of the 1960s and 1970s.

As for Africa in general, I find that there are too many coins depicting lions, rhinos and zebras. I would like to see the more unusual animals on a coin, such as the hyena and the serval.

Over in Australia, most of the coins are too big and should be reduced in size. Also, the 2 dollar coin should become larger than the dollar, since both coins are in a similar-coloured metal. It makes sense.
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eurocoin

I would like to see a new coin series of Suriname. The majority of the designs on them has been in use for 55 years now.

Figleaf

I would like to see a major overhaul of US circulating coins. Here are some of my requirements:
  • The Spanish colonial peso is long gone. New denominations: 5, 10, 20, 50 cents 1, 2 and 5 dollars. The low values red, the mid values yellow, the high values white. Save bi-metallics for later.
  • Much attention for making the coins easy to use for the blind. It will help those with a short attention span also.
  • Denominations in clear figures. As little tiny lettering as possible. Mint marks can be tiny, though.
  • No 19th century or fake news mottoes. E PLURIBUS UNUM becomes ONE FROM MANY. The rest goes out the window.
  • No dead presidents. Clean, simple designs that stress real achievements and characteristics: technology, environment, infrastructure, nature. Symbolism, not naturalism.
Can you tell I am a hopeless optimist?

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

Quote from: eurocoin on January 27, 2018, 08:57:30 AMI would like to see a new coin series of Suriname. The majority of the designs on them has been in use for 55 years now.

Suriname reverse.jpg


Suriname obverse.jpg


So here they are.  First off, the country should change its name to Surinam.

I hate any word that ends with a silent "e", for sure and for definite.

Secondly, they should add a 50 cents coin.
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<k>

Here's the Madagascan set.




These designs date from the 1960s.




These designs date from the 1970s and have a socialist character.


A more balanced set, maybe containing some of their unique wildlife, would be welcome.
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<k>

Quote from: Figleaf on January 27, 2018, 11:57:08 AMI would like to see a major overhaul of US circulating coins.



Here are the US obverses. Or have some of them changed already? But yes, time for an overhaul - they are looking rather tired.
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onecenter

#7
I believe some of my own country's designs (USA) need change.

The five-cent piece now has a 3/4-face portrait of Thomas Jefferson.  The reverse was modified during the period 2004-2006 for the bicentennial of the Corps of Discovery.  The 1938-dated Monticello design returned to the reverse in 2007.

The dime's design has not changed since 1946 and the half dollar has not either since 1964.  The half dollar continues to be minted, but in quantities for collector sales only (about 1.5-2 million per Mint) sold by the $10 roll directly from the US Mint since late 2001 and completely by 2002.   

The sizes of the half dollar, quarter dollar and dime date from their original authorizations in the 1790s.  The five-cent piece was sized in 1866 and the cent in 1856-1857.  Only the metallic compositions have changed, and very infrequently, over time.

The quarter dollar receives regular design changes since 1998 with a series of statehood and later territorial designs.  Currently minted are the America the Beautiful series of 56 national parks, preserves, monuments and so on.  By the end of 2018, the America the Beautiful series can be extended for a second group of 56 national parks, preserves, monuments and so on, again one per state or territory, beginning again in 2022.

Dollar coins are whole other world of fits and starts of circulation that never extend beyond a year or two, yet we continue to mint them year after year.  A new series of American innovations and inventions is being proposed in Congress to compliment the Native American series of annual designs.

Possibly the only other nation that has kept such continuously stable designs for such a long period of time is Switzerland.
Mark

<k>

So would you be in favour of any size changes, onecenter?

As for designs what would you like to see? Keep the current statesmen? Or include some new ones - maybe replace them all? Or perhaps you would prefer a thematic set, with animals, architecture, etc?
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onecenter

What I have read many times in the numismatic press is that, among the collector community, there is a desire to return to allegorical designs of liberty.  I would not mind a return to the design era of 1907-1947 when sculptors such as Augustus St. Gaudens and Adolph Weinmann designed our coins ($10 and $20 gold, and the silver half dollar and dime, respectively and the current obverse of the American silver eagle).

In particular, and one of my personal favorites, is the flying eagle design of Christian Goebrecht in the 1830's, used for a silver dollar denomination in 1836 and later for the short series of 1856 (pattern) and 1857-1858 Flying Eagle cents.

There is nothing wrong with political leaders and statesmen on coinage, as long as the incumbent and their predecessors do not receive such honors until long after their tenure.  What has surprised me is there has never been a series of coins, circulating or commemorative for the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence in 1776.  We have 56 quarter dollars for states and territories and 56 national parks, why not the 56 men who staked their lives and fortunes on the American experiment? 

On the most radical end of the spectrum, and I am sure few people in my country would support such radical change, is the total redenomination of the dollar, at a rate of 100 to 1.  Coins would more readily circulate again and have real purchasing power.  The only coin that really circulates continuously in the USA is the quarter dollar.
Mark

<k>

Quote from: onecenter on January 27, 2018, 08:14:35 PM
I would not mind a return to the design era of 1907-1947 when sculptors such as Augustus St. Gaudens and Adolph Weinmann designed our coins ($10 and $20 gold, and the silver half dollar and dime, respectively and the current obverse of the American silver eagle).

In particular, and one of my personal favorites, is the flying eagle design of Christian Goebrecht in the 1830's, used for a silver dollar denomination in 1836 and later for the short series of 1856 (pattern) and 1857-1858 Flying Eagle cents.

Looking backwards is not good, which is why I did not include it among my options. I am exiling you to Canada as a punishment.  :P

Quote
We have 56 quarter dollars for states and territories and 56 national parks, why not the 56 men who staked their lives and fortunes on the American experiment? 

Nice idea.

Quote
On the most radical end of the spectrum, and I sure few people in my country would support such radical change, is the total redenomination of the dollar, at a rate of 100 to 1.  Coins would more readily circulate again and have real purchasing power.  The only coin that really circulates continuously in the USA is the quarter dollar.

So the lowest coin would be one cent, but it would be worth a current dollar?  :o
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onecenter

I agree with looking toward the future.  Freshness.  New approaches for the times.

I read all the time that there are 327 million people in the USA and someone should be able to design classic American numismatic art to withstand the ages.  Elizabeth Jones, the former Chief Engraver of the US Mint designed the $5 gold Nike/Liberty head for the obverse of the commemorative gold coin in 1988.  Simple elegance.  The use of Thomas Jefferson's handwritten 'Liberty' on the obverse of the five-cent piece is also innovative for American coinage.  We could also go so far as to extend the original 1790s motto in full, 'liberty, parent of science and industry.'

And yes, the value of the current US$ would be equivalent to one cent in a redenominated dollar.  Critics of the Federal Reserve System of Banks have referred to the value of the dollar having declined to just one cent since the creation of the current banking system in 1913!

It would be great to introduce bimetallic coinage, as well.  Our friends in the European Union, Canada, Britain and elsewhere have made these coins work extremely well in commerce.
Mark

<k>

Quote from: onecenter on January 27, 2018, 10:14:12 PM
And yes, the value of the current US$ would be equivalent to one cent in a redenominated dollar.  Critics of the Federal Reserve System of Banks have referred to the value of the dollar having declined to just one cent since the creation of the current banking system in 1913!

Yes, but technology means you get a lot more bang for your buck these days!
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chrisild

Don't think anything will happen in the US. The dime is still smaller than the nickel because once upon a time ;) it contained silver, and even these days there is no circulation coin with a face value higher than 25 cents.

In the euro area and the UK, I would like to bid farewell to the 0.01 and 0.02 denominations. Switzerland is strange in that their banknotes have very modern designs and are updated every couple of years, but most circulation coins have 19th century designs ...

Christian

<k>

In the UK, our oldest circulating coins are the 1p and 2p, and those minted before 1982 (1971 to 1981) still have the legend "NEW PENCE" - the only circulating coins that do so, even though they are now very old and hardly new.

I would dearly like to see the UK coin series updated again. Heraldry in the 21st century!  ::)
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.