Author Topic: Canadian coin with lion  (Read 884 times)

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Offline ghipszky

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Canadian coin with lion
« on: November 02, 2016, 02:55:36 AM »
This coin is 24mm in diameter. I think the lion on the reverse is a rampaging lion with a crown, running left. Is all of that right?
Ginger

Offline bagerap

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Re: Canadian coin with lion
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2016, 03:14:35 AM »
British ten pence piece.

Online Figleaf

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Re: Canadian coin with lion
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2016, 09:36:19 AM »
Before the French revolution, coins of feudal states didn't carry country names, but the titles of the rulers. Some of those titles were misleading, but the first one was usually correct. That's because people were supposed to be loyal to a ruler, not to a land or a people. If a French Bourbon inherited Spain, for instance, the Spaniards were supposed to shift their loyalty to a Frenchman unquestioningly.

One of the ultimate effects of the French revolution was that people, not a ruler, became the supreme power (sovereignty of the people.) Titles were replaced by country names. As an opponent of the French revolution, Britain rejected that change. It also stuck with latin on its coins, rather than the language of the people. Therefore, on most UK coins, you will find a title like BRITT:REX (or REG) or something more convoluted on the coin and you're supposed to know that stands for king or queen of Britain. This coin goes even one step further by omitting the BRITT. It amounts to the same thing. The coin is British.

Confusingly, some former British colonies may use the same portrait and legends. However, in such cases there is always a reference to the country it was struck for, mostly the name of the (ex-)colony, but often, symbols are added, ranging from heraldry and allegories to typical plants or animals. In the case of Canada, the latter may be a maple leaf or a beaver.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline FosseWay

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Re: Canadian coin with lion
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2016, 11:53:02 AM »
It also stuck with latin on its coins, rather than the language of the people.

As have Canada and Switzerland, and all for the same reason: it means you don't have to worry about annoying people who feel you're discriminating against them by using the "wrong" language. Tradition plays its part as well, of course, but I suspect that if the UK and Canada were homogeneously English-speaking the language would have been changed some time ago.

There are, of course, other ways round the problem. You can issue the same coin in two (or more) languages every year, as Belgium did before 2002. You can alternate languages from year to year and/or denomination to denomination, as South Africa does with its long list of official languages. You can ensure that there is no language-specific text on the coin at all, as Belgium now does with its euros and Canada generally does with its reverses (commemoratives excepted).

The lack of explicit issuing authority on UK coins only dates from 1954. Prior to that, and all the way back to the first kings to claim authority over the whole of England in the 9th century, there has almost always been some allusion to the state - Rex/Regina Angliae/Anglorum, similar with Scotiae/Scotorum, Magnae Britanniae etc.