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UK commemorative themes for 2016

Started by <k>, October 18, 2015, 04:17:19 PM

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eurocoin

Quote from: Bimat on July 13, 2017, 04:32:11 PM
Do these news sources get paid by the Royal Mint to publish silly stuff like this? Almost every British news source is having similar stories everyday. >:(

Aditya

I am fairly sure the Westminster Collection is behind this particular article and many others. Furthermore there is a self-proclaimed coin expert called Alex Cassidy who sends similar rubbish to the media. Recently it has also occured that a collector (Richard Bird) has sent fake news to the media to make the error coin that he found worth more. He used a very sick way to get the attention from the media for his story.

To my knowledge The Royal Mint only occasionally sends out press releases when new coins come out. As far as I know they do not speculate.

Alan71

Quote from: Bimat on July 13, 2017, 04:32:11 PM
Do these news sources get paid by the Royal Mint to publish silly stuff like this? Almost every British news source is having similar stories everyday. >:(
It's not really a silly story though.  The info is correct.  The Royal Mint does post such stuff on Facebook, and that's where it comes from.  Press releases are a bit last century.  The media picks everything up from social media and publishes it for the "benefit" of those that don't use social media. 

I'm no happier about this than anyone else as it's made any Tom, Dick or Harry get into coin collecting in the hope they can make some money out of it.  It's driven up prices and spoilt it for everyone else, but if something is getting a lot of interest on Facebook or Twitter, then the mainstream media is bound to pick up on it.

Figleaf

Quote from: Alan71 on July 13, 2017, 08:13:30 PM
It's not really a silly story though.

I want to take issue with that. The story is fake news in the sense that the Kew coins are not rare and not even scarce. They are just hard to find now that RM has hyped them. It is the job of the media to check facts, not to copy any sort of silliness on letterheaded paper.

The damage is done now. In my experience, coin prices are sticky on the downside. They go up, but go down only by way of inflation. The net result of the RM's irresponsible action will be that hoards of Kew coins have ended up in the hands of the get-rich-quickly crowd, who will keep them with the coronation and jubileeware, license plates, coppered baby shoes and antique bird houses they are already stuck with. They'll gather dust for one to two generations until they trickle back to the market.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Alan71

210,000 is quite rare isn't it?  Well, not rare but in terms of circulation issues it's quite small.  I think the interest in it is justified.  And Jemima Puddleduck does have the smallest circulation issue of the Beatrix Potter coins (2,100,000).  A fair few of the Olympic series had smaller issues, but that was a bigger series.

Other than that I definitely agree with your post though, Peter.

eurocoin

In 2018, the Royal Mint has minted additional 2016-dated Beatrix Potter coins in BU quality. This due to high demand. This is an unprecedented situation. The mint claims it has no plans to rerelease any other commemoratives issued in the past.

redlock

Quote from: eurocoin on February 08, 2018, 03:40:54 PM
In 2018, the Royal Mint has minted additional 2016-dated Beatrix Potter coins in BU quality.

This news leaves me ... speechless  :o :o

andyg

This is from the Coincraft catalogue of 1997, as far as I know it's still mint policy.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

onecenter

#157
If I remember correctly, British decimal coinage has had some instances of coins minted in more than one year with all the same date.  The 1973 50 pence [then] EEC circulating commemorative was issued over a period beyond 1973, perhaps 1975.  Some of our British experts may correct this assumption.

The two-pound bimetallic coin crossed the 1997-1998 threshold with two different dates and may have had a similar minting pattern.

The 1971-dated half penny, penny and two pence were struck well in advance of the February 15, 1971 to be ready in quantity for the release date and conversion to the decimalized pound.

The 1972-1976 proof sets were all issued at one time, in one lot of five sets, but I am not sure if the complete offering, as it was available in the USA as one lot, was also made all available beforehand in Britain.
Mark

<k>

Quote from: onecenter on February 08, 2018, 11:04:00 PM
If I remember correctly, British decimal coinage has had some instances of coins minted in more than one year with all the same date.  The 1973 50 pence [then] EEC circulating commemorative was issued over a period beyond 1973, perhaps 1975.

True. The EEC 50p was minted as late as either March or April 1975, but with the frozen date of 1973.

Quote from: onecenter on February 08, 2018, 11:04:00 PM
The 1971-dated half penny, penny and two pence were struck well in advance of the February 15, 1971 to be ready in quantity for the release date and conversion to the decimalized pound.

And you could also buy a full decimal set from the Post Office, I believe it was in 1969 (?), which contained bronze coins dated 1971!
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

andyg

Quote from: <k> on February 08, 2018, 11:07:48 PM
And you could also buy a full decimal set from the Post Office, I believe it was in 1969 (?), which contained bronze coins dated 1971!

More recently (which I'd forgotten all about until you posted that <k>) the 2011 Olympic coins were to be found in change at the back end of 2010.
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

AardHawk

I believe that the Royal Mint is only authorised to issue coins with a particular date. I doesnt matter what the year of minting and/or issue actually is.

FosseWay

Quote from: onecenter on February 08, 2018, 11:04:00 PM
The 1971-dated half penny, penny and two pence were struck well in advance of the February 15, 1971 to be ready in quantity for the release date and conversion to the decimalized pound.

And conversely, the last £sd issues was struck with a fixed date of 1967 for the last few years, supposedly to "prevent hoarding". I'm not entirely clear why they thought hoarding would be a problem or why not changing the date was thought to solve the problem.

eurocoin

Quote from: andyg on February 08, 2018, 10:13:42 PM
This is from the Coincraft catalogue of 1997, as far as I know it's still mint policy.

Although I have no idea how things were 20 years ago, these days mintage figures are figures of actual production, not of what was issued into circulation.

To comment on all of the mentioned examples in all of the further comments, none of them describes a similar situation as what has currently happened so I do not see their relevancy.

andyg

I quote from the above;
"The situation is greatly complicated by the existence of issue limits, where coins can be struck because of public demand well after the original issue"

::)
always willing to trade modern UK coins for modern coins from elsewhere....

Alan71

Quote from: eurocoin on February 09, 2018, 03:52:53 PM
Although I have no idea how things were 20 years ago, these days mintage figures are figures of actual production, not of what was issued into circulation.

To comment on all of the mentioned examples in all of the further comments, none of them describes a similar situation as what has currently happened so I do not see their relevancy.
Nothing's changed.  The figures are for the dates on the coins, not when they were struck.  In the days before the internet I used to ring the Mint each year for an updated list of coins issued.  I'd always look over the previous few dates, not just the latest one, as (has as been said by others) coins can be both struck and issued several years after the dates on them. 

Issue limits determine how many are struck, but they aren't necessarily struck until they're needed.  The situation with the 2016 Beatrx Potter coins really isn't unprecedented.

I'm not really sure why issue limits exist.  If they didn't, coins could just be struck with that year's date.  It's always been that way though.