Music: Two or More Different Instruments on a Design

Started by Abhay, February 09, 2011, 10:15:27 AM

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Abhay

Although not strictly related to Music, but this 100 Rupee coin on "International Year of the Child" shows musical instrumnets used in India. This coin shows "Mridingam" and "Veena" alongwith a dancing girl.

This coin was issued in two versions, one a normal 100 Rupee coin with weight of about 29 grams and the other one as PIEFORT with weight 59 grams.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

Abhay

Quote from: alglasser on February 09, 2011, 06:17:47 PM
Hello, Engipress.

Great lopoking 100 Rupee coin there. It is now on my "hunt list". Thank you for sharing!!!

Alan

Dear Alan,

This 100 Rupee coin is quite rare, as they were issued only as Proof Coins. The 29 Gram Coin should cost something about Rs. 10,000.00 (About US $ 220) while the 58 Gram PIEFORT is well worth Rs. 100,000.00 (About US $ 2200). However, chinese Forgeries are available much cheaper, so beware of the Fake Cheap Chinese Forgeries of this coin.

Abhay
INVESTING IN YESTERDAY

izotz

Regarding Spanish coins I can only remember this ones :

KM932 10 Pesetas (1994) Musician Pablo Sarasate


KM931 5 Pesetas (1994) Aragon
Although it depicts the region of Aragon, you can see a typical dance on the obverse :


KM965 200 Pesetas (1996) Musicians
Although it depicts some famous paintings, you can see two different music players :

Alan Glasser

Hello, everyone; Bimat,Izotz, Figleaf, Engipress, Chrisild and Aditya...and I hope I didn't leave anyone out!

Thanks so much for the time and effort to share your music coins lists. I have now several new pieces to hunt for...I had a few already, but everyone's assistance is so very much appreciated.

I am particularly intrigued by the Alfonso X El Sabio coin. I assume it is from Spain? By the way, I WAS under the impression that Greensleeves was composed by Henry 8th. If I remember my college days lectures, the green sleeves made reference to reference to "ladies of questionable character", or was that "orange girls". Funny the things you remember from high school. Guess I'll have to go research that now.

Anyway, thanks one and all. Oh, Figleaf, a while back I saw a photo of the angklung on the 1000 Rupiah Indonesia coin. I believe I thought it was an industrial scene. Guess I'll follow Aditya's lead and see if I can obtain one from someone selling them here on World of Coins.

Have a terrific day, everyone.

Alan in snow buried Massachusetts

izotz

Quote from: alglasser on February 10, 2011, 04:45:17 PM
I am particularly intrigued by the Alfonso X El Sabio coin. I assume it is from Spain?

Yes it is from Spain. Take into account it is a non legal tender coin (medal). You could get it from the Spanish mint for much more than face value :
http://www.fnmt.es/index.php?cha=collector&scha=14&page=423&spage=336
(click on "Welcome" at the top of the page to get the English version).

Alan Glasser

The spanish coin site is beautiful. I am goping to hunt for the Alfonso X coin and see if perhaps I can find one on e-Bay at some point. It is beautiful. I see that it is not listed in the 2011 Standard Catalog of World Coins.

Anywya, thanks for pointing this coin out. I have printed your post and photo to include in my "look for this coin list.

Alan



izotz

I suppose you are looking for it in the "2000 - to date" book and not in the 20th century book. Anyway, I will check it later.

You needn't hunt for it. It is still available in the Spanish mint shop :
https://tienda.fnmt.es/fnmttv/catalog/setCurrentItem/%28xcm=Z_TIENDA&layout=6_1_66_55_6&uiarea=2&ctype=areaDetails&next=seeItem&carea=0000000063&citem=00000000630000000002%29/.do
(again, click in the "Welcome" link)
But as I told you, the price is much more above face, this is 44 euros for the silver medal.
I'm not sure whether they would ship it to foreign countries, but you could find a solution for it ;)

Alan Glasser

Hello.

alan with a "music coin" question.

Does anyone know why Ecuador issued 1 Sucer silver coins in 2005 with Musical Instruments (and other topics) on them? I'm not sure they are "coins" but they are in my collection anyway. Not listed in any cataolg that I have seen and haven't been able to learn anything on the net. Very curious.

Thanks.  Alan

Figleaf

Quote from: alglasser on February 10, 2011, 09:23:43 PM
Does anyone know why Ecuador issued 1 Sucer silver coins in 2005 with Musical Instruments (and other topics) on them? I'm not sure they are "coins" but they are in my collection anyway. Not listed in any cataolg that I have seen and haven't been able to learn anything on the net. Very curious.

The Ecuadorian sucre is an obsolete currency. It was exchanged for USD during 2000 at a rate of 25 000 sucre for 1 USD. All pieces denominated in sucre after 2000 are fantasies, not coins. As a thematic collector, you don't have to worry about the status of these things, unless you will eventually want to sell your collection, as there will be very little demand for them.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

As for the demand, that is probably true for many "oddball" issues. ;) However, despite the dollarization in 2000, Ecuador continues to issue sucre-denominated collector coins. ("Adicionalmente al decreto de aprobación, se establecen las tipológicas para la moneda de UN SUCRE, especie que el Banco Central del Ecuador acuñó con fines CONMEMORATIVOS." http://www.bce.fin.ec/documentos/PublicacionesNotas/Notas/Dolarizacion/cono_dolar/elSucre.pdf) Sure, we can say that they do not circulate, and thus are NCLT or pseudo-coinage. But fantasy pieces? Not necessarily.

The 2005 "Musical Instruments" piece, however, I have not seen either ...

Christian

Figleaf

[rant]What would you call a series of coins denominated in Reichsmark, struck by the Oddball Mint? Legal tender? Just because it's catalogued doesn't mean it's for real. KM 112-115 may have a shameless legal basis, but that doesn't make them coins. They're medals with a non-existant denomination.[/rant]

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

chrisild

Those 1 sucre pieces were minted by the Royal Spanish Mint (FNMT-RCM) in Madrid, and issued by the Central Bank of Ecuador (BCE). Oddball? Sure. :( For example, Ecuador issued a 25,000 sucres (ie. $1) thingie for the 2006 Football World Cup. One year later, they have a 1 sucre "Olympic Sports" piece (ie. you would need 25,000 of these to get one US dollar) with precisely the same specifications.

However, at least for me, a fantasy piece would be something issued by some third party, or in the name of some non-existing country. In the case of awfully prolific "coin issuers" such as Liberia, Palau, Niue, etc. it will definitely be hard (or impossible) to know what is "authorized" and what is "private". I definitely do not appreciate the plethora of "coins" that nobody actually uses as means of payment. But in my opinion it is just not really helpful to have only two categories for coins - one, the pieces that were/are actually used in everyday life, and two, everything else.

Christian

Alan Glasser

Very interesting reading as always...and educational too. Thanks, guys...and ladies? What a smart group!

Coins or not, because I am thematic (no pun here) in my Music coin collection, a date a denomination and a country are the requirements to gain entry...though many legitimate "coins" are dateless.

The Ecuador "SUCER" coins not "Sucre" as is the currency, are proof silver pieces the size of a U.S. half dollar.The "SUCER" confused me, as does the fact that the musical instruments on the reverse are surrounded by Chinese (or is it Japanese...sorry...I need to research that) notation. If I get time this weekend, I'll try to use the suggestions I received in another thread and post pictures. I'm a computer illiterate...so please don't wait with bated breath. 

Harp coins...well...I was going to try to include 1 harp coin from each country that used harps on their coins...got started in Israel and Ireland and decided that 1 harp was enough when I started looking at ancients with harps on them. Though I have to admit that I am liking the looks of that 50 Pence piece with the harp on it. May I should start another sub category...harps from all nations...I think I would need a small truck.

Today in my e-mail is an offering for a mint set from Greece in a musical packing commemorating 100 years since the birth of Sofia Vempo...(WHO???) guess I have to look her up...but $79 is a bit steep I think. I'll wait until they hit the E-Bay circuit.

Finally, I have won on E-Bay,the beautiful Spain Alfonso 2008 10 Euro Spain piece...he will go into the "composer" section of the music collection.

Be well, everyone, and thanks for the very enjoyable and informative reading!!  Alan

chrisild

That "sucer" definitely sounds fishy. 8) Found'em: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=250768059651 (and there's a few more like that). No idea who had these made ...

Yes, the Alfonso piece is a nicely designed one. Sofia Vembo I had to look up myself. :) By the way, in 2007 Greece issued a coin set with a €10 collector coin honoring Maria Callas. Total mintage is only 5,000 though.

Christian

Alan Glasser

chrisild

Yes, those are the "Sucer" coins. If you look closely, you'll see the Chinese characters on the reverse. Go figure. Anyone read Chinese? I think it translates to, "He who buy these is big fool"...kind of like a fortune cookie...but anyway...I bought 2.

Thanks for the Maria Callas tip. Missed that one...I'm on the hunt as we speak!!!

Alan