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VERENIGDE OOSTINDISCHE COMPAGNIE ( VOC)

Started by nguyen anh tu, December 04, 2009, 02:27:09 AM

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nguyen anh tu

     COINS FOR USE BY THE VOC IN THE NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES WERE STRUCK IN THE FOLLOWING PROVINCES .
PROVINCE OF HOLLAND ' HOLL'
PROVINCE OF WEST FRIESLAND ' WESTF'
PROVINCE OF ZEELAND ' ZEEL' OR ' ZEL'
PROVINCE OF UTRECHT ' TRAI'
PROVINCE OF GELDERLAND ' GEL'
PROVINCE OF OVERRIJSEL ' TRANSI'



                               ZEELAND : 1/2 DUIT 1770; 1 DUIT 1767
                


                               UTRECHT : 1/2 DUIT 1769; 1 DUIT 1764; 2 DUIT 1790




                               GELDERLAND : 1 DUIT 1787




                               WEST FRIESLAND : 1 DUIT 1789



                               HOLLAND : 1/2 DUIT 1770; 1 DUIT 1766


Overlord

Thanks for posting these, nguyen anh tu. I have always loved VOC Duits. I'm sure Peter and the others will have some interesting information on the symbols above the VOC monogram.

Berani

There were made some different VOC-guldens as well. At the pictures shown VOC-guldens from Gelderland, Utrecht, West-Friesland and Zeeland.

Figleaf

The VOC had a number of sovereign rights, such as negotiating treaties, declaring and waging war and striking coins. These rights were limited, so they would not have any consequences in the Republic itself. For coins, it was stipulated that they had to be struck in Dutch mints and be clearly distinguishable from Dutch coins - hence the cartouche with VOC on these coins.

The big problem in those days was always to get the price relations between metals right. To prevent VOC coins from entering into circulation in Europe, the copper duit was set at a rate of 4 to the silver stuiver (the unit of account for small transactions), while in the Republic, a stuiver was 8 duiten. To smugglers, that meant that copper coins were twice as expensive in Asia, so it didn't pay to export VOC coins to the Republic. As in theory the coins had to be minted in Europe, it also didn't pay to smuggle copper to Asia.

However, the arrangement for copper coins upset the silver coins price, as they were in direct competition, primarily with Spanish and Spanish colonial coins. There was quite a bit of experimentation, but usually, the tariffs made it worthwhile to melt silver VOC coins. It didn't help that the VOC underpaid the crews, with the tacit understanding that they could smuggle coins. In fact, the captain's cabin contained a special smuggling chest for all the officers. It counted as the captain's private affairs, so it couldn't be opened by VOC customs. Deck hands had to find their own hiding place, but on a big ship, that's not a big problem.

The result today is that the coppers are plentiful, while the silver, especially the largest coins, is hard to find.

The guldens shown all have a climbing lion with sword and a bundle of arrows. This is not the arms of Holland, but the arms of the federation of which Holland was part: the Republic of the seven united Netherlands. After 1672, the federation gained in power on coins and minting. It set a standard and a design for all mints to adhere to. The major difference allowed was a reference to the province the mint was in, e.g. the Dordrecht mint would put HOL for Holland on its silver, including its VOC silver, while the Middelburg mint would put ZEL on the same place. Therefore, I think these coins are not provincial coins, but coins of either the federation or the VOC with a mintmark.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Afrasi

What about the small silver coins? Did they really circulate in Dutch East India? If yes, why are they so scarce? Here an example with the arms of Holland:

Figleaf

This is an off-metal strike in silver of a duit. They also exist in gold. Although struck with regular dies, these are not coins, but new year gift items. They are not foreseen in any regulation, but tolerated as a way for the mint master to enhance his income. So, no they did not circulate anywhere.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.