Act of Union

Started by bart, April 04, 2009, 10:57:38 PM

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bart

My youngest daughter spent some days in London last week. They call it a school trip. I was pleasantly surprised because:
- they didn't demonstrate against the G20 summit (Pa, what does G20 mean?)
- she didn't spend all the money she took on the trip.
- she brought me back in her spare change a magnificent 2 pound coin, commemorating the tercentenary of the Act of Union of England and Scotland in 1707. The coin shows on the obverse the bust of Elizabeth II by Ian Rank-Broadley, and on the reverse the English rose and the Scottish thistle. The edge inscription reads:* UNITED INTO ONE KINGDOM *
On the other hand my eldest daughter went to Berlin and surprised me because:
- she only sent us 1 SMS on Wednesday (the trip was from Sunday to Friday): " Today, I ran out of money " . We laughed because we thaught it was a April, 1st-joke. It wasn't.
- she was really enthousiast about Berlin (which wasn't the case when she stepped on the bus on Sunday: "People speak German over there"). She didn't know what the Brandenburger Tor is, but she had visited many shops specialized in Gothic clothes. She wants to go back as soon as possible.

I show you the 2 pound coin I received from my youngest daughter's pocket change (which also incuded a Matthew Dent penny and an "old design" 2008 20 pence coin by William Gardner).

bart

BC Numismatics

Bart,
  That is a very nice coin that you have posted up there.

Aidan.

Figleaf

Daughters and dads. ;)

I guess the act of the union and all that stuff is hard to bring to life. If you can interest her in reading Waverley she may, one day, realize how important it was in British history.

I understand being ignorant about the Brandenburger Tor, but I hope she took a tour of the Reichstag and the time to read the texts with the pictures on the ground floor, so that one day, she'll realize how important it was in the history of a whole generation on both sides of the Atlantic.

Meanwhile, you have another piece of evidence in your collection that your daughters love you, in spite of your coin collection habit. :)

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Bimat

Thats a really nice commemorative she got there.That also means that these commemoratives actually circulate in U.K.I don't think same is the case with 2 Pound commemoratives of Isle of Man, Gibraltar,Jersey  etc.Some of them are really amazing,but I haven't seen a single coin...

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

bart

Quote from: Figleaf on April 05, 2009, 01:40:35 AM
Meanwhile, you have another piece of evidence in your collection that your daughters love you, in spite of your coin collection habit. :)

Peter

That's really true, Peter!  ;)  In spite of my coin collection habit... ;D ;D ;D

Quote from: smallpoxThat two pound coin is a very attractive one, but I can't help thinking the designer was subliminally influenced by the Microsoft logo.   What do you reckon, Bart?

I don't know...  I only see a rose, a thistle and 2 portcullis. ???
But then... I am not really a computerfreak, more a twisted coin freak :P ;D

bart

chrisild

Microsoft? Jigsaw? Hmm, I don't quite get this ...

Christian

a3v1

Quote from: chrisild on April 06, 2009, 11:38:53 AM
Microsoft? Jigsaw? Hmm, I don't quite get this ...
@ Christian,
See anything familiar now? ;)
Regards,
a3v1
Over half a century of experience as a coin collector.
-------------
Money is like body fat: If there's too much of it, it always is in the wrong places.

chrisild

Ah yes ... duh. Well, I am much more familiar with the bitten apple logo ;) and in XP which I need to use from time to time I have not seen the jigsaw logo yet. But right, they are kind of similar. Still a nice design - don't know though how popular that coin is or was in Scotland ...

Christian

tonyclayton

Quote from: numismatica on April 05, 2009, 10:52:11 AM
That also means that these commemoratives actually circulate in U.K.I don't think same is the case with 2 Pound commemoratives of Isle of Man, Gibraltar,Jersey  etc.Some of them are really amazing,but I haven't seen a single coin...

Aditya

I think that it is one of the best things about UK coins, that the two pound and fifty pence commemoratives are frequently found in change, but not so frequently that it gets boring.  When they issued the EEC 50p in 1973 they were extremely common, and the Royal Mint made a deliberate decision for later commemoratives that once a fixed smaller mintage had been reached the remaining demand in a given year would revert to the standard design. Exceptionally the 1992/1993 EEC commemorative was issued in very small numbers because demand for 50p coins was low at that time.