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Henry VIII

Started by ghipszky, March 29, 2009, 04:42:15 AM

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ghipszky

It is a unique joke to be sure. Are all of your Tudor family coins hammered??
Ginger

translateltd

I don't have any struck ones, although there was an experiment with mechanical production during Elizabeth's reign, and very nice the struck coins look, too.  It was almost another century before it was tried again, this time permanently.


ghipszky

What is the difference between struck and hammered?
Ginger

translateltd

Quote from: ghipszky on April 03, 2009, 03:30:20 AM
What is the difference between struck and hammered?
Ginger

By struck I mean machine-struck or milled, like our modern coinage.  The French did some experiments with machine-struck coinage in the 1560s and the technology was tried out briefly in England.  While the results were good the technology wasn't made permanent, probably because of industrial unrest - threats to the livelihood of those tasked with striking the coins by hand, for instance.


ghipszky

Oh I was thinking about the way the romans did it, and their coins are called struck. That's where I was getting confused. Because I have heard about English Hammered coins too.
Ginger

BC Numismatics

Quote from: translateltd on April 02, 2009, 08:05:00 PM
I don't have any struck ones, although there was an experiment with mechanical production during Elizabeth's reign, and very nice the struck coins look, too.  It was almost another century before it was tried again, this time permanently.



Martin,
  Those coins are very scarce,considering that they were part of Eloye Mestrelle's failed experiment of 1561-62.Ironically,Mestrelle himself was executed in 1572 - for coin forgery!

Aidan.

translateltd

Quote from: ghipszky on April 03, 2009, 04:13:40 AM
Oh I was thinking about the way the romans did it, and their coins are called struck. That's where I was getting confused. Because I have heard about English Hammered coins too.
Ginger

That was my carelessness in not specifying what sort of "struck".  Roman "struck" coins are hammered as opposed to cast.  I should have said "machine-struck" first time round!  My Elizabethan coins are all hammered, not machine-struck.




ghipszky

OK Martin, Thanks for sorting those different meanings out.
Ginger

translateltd

I picked up a new "Henry" at the Auckland fair during the weekend - a Canterbury halfgroat of Archbishop Wareham that sounds like the same type Aidan mentioned in his earlier posting.  I've added a pic to the same site as the others:

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~translate/Tudors/

The portrait actually looks rather better in real life than it does in the photo, which was one of the things that helped me to undo the chains on my wallet on Saturday ...


BC Numismatics

Martin,
  Yours is more worn than mine,but mine has a small hole in it though.

Who did you get that off at last Saturday's fair?

Howard Mitchell had some really nice English traders' currency tokens on his stand,including a 17th. Century 1/2d. that was issued by a woman.

Aidan.

translateltd

Quote from: BC Numismatics on May 06, 2009, 10:43:19 AM

Who did you get that off at last Saturday's fair?


Jim Johnson.  Also picked up a silver penny of one of the Edwards struck at the Berwick mint - near enough to Newcastle to be of greater interest than those of points further south.

BC Numismatics

Martin,
  Berwick is one mint that I don't have represented,but I do have a King Edward I 1d. that was struck at Newcastle-on-Tyne though.

I saw Jim Johnson's prices on his coins.They were way out of my league.

Aidan.

tonyclayton

Quote from: translateltd on April 03, 2009, 06:48:47 AM
That was my carelessness in not specifying what sort of "struck".  Roman "struck" coins are hammered as opposed to cast.  I should have said "machine-struck" first time round!  My Elizabethan coins are all hammered, not machine-struck.


In UK collecting circles the machine struck coins are always called 'milled', while the earlier types are called 'hammered'.  The main difference is that hammered coins are struck without a collar.

The reason the experiment during the Reign of Elizabeth I was short-lived is that the hammerers could produce coin 10 times faster, even though the milled versions were of far superior quality.  As has been said, Eloye Msetrelle went into business on his own account and so was hanged at Norwich with his three accomplices.

UK Decimal +

Here is a topic about an Elizabeth I silver penny.   The illustrations are repeated below - sorry it's not in the best of condition, but it shows enough detail to be recognized.

Bill.
Ilford, Essex, near London, England.

People look for problems and complain.   Engineers find solutions but people still complain.