News:

Register to attend our live meetings.

Main Menu

New article on Korean Coins

Started by Verify-12, January 13, 2014, 03:01:42 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Gaurav

#15
Yeah, I think I saw one with only English letters, so from 2001-2004 they are higher quality? Interesting.

Though I am surprised to hear that "foreign" sets made after 2004 sell at ta premium, with identical coins, This is interesting.

Regarding bulk coins, I was hoping for a easier way to get circulating 10/50/100 won but I guess I wont.

Interesting fun fact: When you add all the denominations of "regular" Korean coins it comes to 666 (1+5+10+50+100+500)!

Gaurav

Hi, Bought the Dae Gwang-sa, pretty decent book with colour photographs. Would have been much better if I could understand Korean!

Bimat

Quote from: Gaurav on January 27, 2014, 09:01:42 AM
Interesting fun fact: When you add all the denominations of "regular" Korean coins it comes to 666 (1+5+10+50+100+500)!

Same is the case with Japan (¥666). :)

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Figleaf

It's the logical consequence of a 1-5 series with denominations varying by 10ˆx, where x is zero or a whole number. A 1-2-5 series would yield 888 for x = 0, 1, 2. Example: if there were a five euro coin, the denominations of the euro would add up to 888 cent (1-2-5-10-20-50-100-200-500). Include banknotes and you can take it to €888.88 without cheating. No such regularity for fractions, like a 1-2½-5 series, because the halves get in the way. The Soviets and Soviet Bulgarians couldn't always do it either with their 1-2-3-5 series because for x = 0, the total is more than 10, but they could make a symmetric number, e.g. for x =  0, 1, 2: 1221 kopeks.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Gaurav

Quote from: Bimat on February 02, 2014, 03:26:18 PM
Same is the case with Japan (¥666). :)

Aditya

Interesting that Japan and Korea share the same total denomination, especially since Yen trades at 10x of Won. Are all of the Japanese coins circulating or are there special coins like 1000 Won which are only released as part of sets/special occasions?

Bimat

Monometallic ¥500 coins circulate, bimetallic don't. ¥1000 are 1 Oz silver collector coins only, not intended for circulation.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Gaurav

#21
Quote from: Figleaf on February 02, 2014, 04:56:19 PM
It's the logical consequence of a 1-5 series with denominations varying by 10ˆx, where x is zero or a whole number. A 1-2-5 series would yield 888 for x = 0, 1, 2. Example: if there were a five euro coin, the denominations of the euro would add up to 888 cent (1-2-5-10-20-50-100-200-500). Include banknotes and you can take it to €888.88 without cheating. No such regularity for fractions, like a 1-2½-5 series, because the halves get in the way. The Soviets and Soviet Bulgarians couldn't always do it either with their 1-2-3-5 series because for x = 0, the total is more than 10, but they could make a symmetric number, e.g. for x =  0, 1, 2: 1221 kopeks.

Peter

Peter, can you explain a bit more, like how you derived the euro cents? I mean:
10^0=1,
10^1=10
10^2=100

What after that?

Thanks, Aditya for the info.

Edit: Oh! Got it! I see what you mean now.