Oil rigs and refineries

Started by <k>, March 26, 2011, 02:12:57 AM

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izotz

#15


Spain 50 pesetas 1957 (*64). 25 years of peace.

This was only a rare pattern. It never got into circulation. There are many fakes.  The Spanish Civil War lasted from 1936 to 1939. The issue date would be 1964, the date on the star. So, in case it had been issued, it would be 25 years of peace ("paz") since the end of the Civil War.


<k>

#16
Iran 50 rials 1985.jpg

Iran, 50 rials, 1985.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#17
Argentina, 2 pesos, 2007.jpg

Argentina, 2 pesos, 2007.  Discovery of oil.
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Bimat

#18
UAE 1 dirham 2012.jpg

UAE, 1 Dirham, 2012 commemorative: 50th Anniversary of First Shipment of Oil.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Miner

#19
1.jpg

Mexico. Tamaulipas. Oil rig and capacity on the arms.

<k>

#20
Romania 1 leu 1949.jpg

Romanian, 1 leu, 1949.  Oil drilling tower.

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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#21
UAE 50 fils 1998.jpg

United Arab Emirate, 50 fils, 1998.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#22
Iraq, 250 fils, 1973.jpg

Iraq, 250 fils, 1973.  Oil nationalisation.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#23
Iraq 500 fils 1973.jpg

Iraq, 500 fils, 1973.  Oil nationalisation.
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SquareEarth

#24
Quote from: Figleaf on March 30, 2011, 12:58:19 PMI visited the German-built Baoshan steel plant in the early eighties, when it was gleaming new. It is a continuous casting plant, meaning that the heat of the smelting process is re-used. Starting up the plant is costly, but once it is started up, it is quite efficient. The plant was started up for the occasion of our visit. It ran for a few minutes, spectacularly producing an amount of metal and was shut down again. We were told unofficially, that when the plant ran, there was no electricity left for the area around it, including Baoshan district. The railroad wasn't finished and the port was even less finished, making it difficult to get ore into the plant and taking steel out. Such was the waste of large plants.

The story ends well; the plant now runs well, port and railroad are finished and heavily used. The Chinese government has discovered that its survival depends on private consumption, not production. That also means that it is unlikely we'll see a circulation coin with Baoshan on it.

Peter

Baosteel was a part of broader economic scheme in 1978, nicknamed "foreign leap forward", which referred to the plan's hastiness and its reliance on imported machines. The name was definitely an overstatement as although large sum of hard currency was spent, it did not cause widespread devastation.

Furthermore, "Foreign Leap Forward" had a predecessor, the "Scheme 43": Mao's $4300000000 plan to import chemical fiber, petrochemical, fertilizer, steel, and electricity equipment from the west.

Park Sung Sang, Head of Bank of Korea under President Park Chung Hee, wrote that the initial stage of economic development require the government to build up infrastructure for steel, fertilizer, cement and electricity, because they are necessary to facilitate of economic development, and they are so universally needed that their mere supply generates its own demand. 

It would be hard to imagine China's economy without these infrastructure built in the 1970s (purchased from the west). Even in the 1990s, fertilizers, steel and electricity was in shortage everywhere.


Here is a medal for the first produces of Baosteel.

Regards

Chuan.
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

SquareEarth

#25
Norway 100 kroner 2005.jpg

I find it hard to comprehend why anyone can be proud of their oil because
1) God made it there, not human intelligence;
2) Oil can be more of a curse than a blessing.  It proliferates corruption, and invites foreigners to invade your country.

This country seems an exception:  Norway, Centenary of Independence.
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

<k>

#26
Romania-20-lei-1951.jpg

Romania, 20 lei, 1951. 

An oil cracker with gas being flamed off. Left are two generic chimneys.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

Quote from: SquareEarth on September 17, 2013, 04:50:03 PM
Park Sung Sang, Head of Bank of Korea under President Park Chung Hee, wrote that the initial stage of economic development require the government to build up infrastructure for steel, fertilizer, cement and electricity, because they are necessary to facilitate of economic development, and they are so universally needed that their mere supply generates its own demand.

I would imagine that a survivor of the Park era would think that way. It is, however, dead wrong. Think of how Taiwan developed and you'll see what I mean. Development can be from the bottom up or from the top down or both. There is no standard recipe. India is developing a competitive service sector without having had an competitive industrial sector that it was based on.

Quote from: SquareEarth on September 17, 2013, 05:35:31 PM
I find it hard to comprehend why anyone can be proud of their oil

To poor countries, oil means economic and financial independence, a balanced government budget, financial space to develop a community, jobs. To rich countries, oil is geopolitically significant and an important cost item. Too often, oil turns out to mean corruption and an underpinning for mafia boss-like dictators, out to inflate their bank accounts.

Natural gas (quite similar to oil economically) caused the "Dutch disease", making the government feel richer than it is. Norway has avoided the trap by feeding its oil royalties into an "oil fund" (Government Pension Fund), a sovereign wealth funds. While the solution is appropriate for developed countries, it often seems an instrument to keep current rulers in power in developing countries.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

#28
UAE 1D 2007.JPG

UAE, 1 dirham, 2007.  30th anniversary of Zakum Development Company.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#29
Egypt 1 gunayh 1981.jpg

Egypt, 1 gunayh, 1988.  25th Anniversary of the Ministry of Industry.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.