Author Topic: Hungary, denar, 1527  (Read 3074 times)

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Giovanna

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Hungary, denar, 1527
« on: August 28, 2013, 08:22:56 PM »
Good evening everyone, I go back to visit you to ask for your help in this Hungarian currency.
Unfortunately I do not have the weight and size of the diameter, the coin is a friend of mine.
I found on the web like a coin but has different acronyms, I present to you this has on the obverse the letters K and V, while that which will link has designated K and T.
Wondering if anyone knows the difference between these acronyms and if you know the value of my money.
Thank you all, Gio :) :)

Giovanna

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 08:28:57 PM »
This is the link that I found, is the third coin:

http://www.joelscoins.com/old1.htm



Thanks to all for the help you give me. Giò :) :)

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 09:57:30 PM »
Hungary, denar 1527 in the name of John Zápolya, minted in Kremnitz.

obverse: Zápolya family arms (attached) *IOHANNES*Rex*VNGARiae - John king of Hungary.
reverse: madonna and child PATRONA*   *VNGARIE - patron saint of Hungary.

The K left is the mint mark, the letter on the right is the mark of the master of the mint.

Good to hear from you, Giovanna!

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Giovanna

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 10:36:34 PM »
Hello Peter, I am very happy to reread.
You know if the mint master who signed with the V makes it the rarest coin of the master brand T?
Thanks for the news you gave me

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2013, 12:12:32 AM »
All coins dated 1527 have a T, probably for James Tornallyai, who farmed the mint in that year. The T looks like a V because of the type of letters used. The upper bar is not straight, but bent (keep in mind that new dies were cut by hand.) In general, coins like these are collected by type, not by date or mint master, so that dates and mint master marks have no influence on scarcity. Even legend varieties are not very important for scarcity.

Reference: Huszar 881, Pohl 265

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Giovanna

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2013, 10:57:03 AM »
Hello Peter, thanks for the news special, you're very kind as always.
I hope to return soon this great favor you did to me.
See you soon and thank you, Gio

Offline ChrisHagen

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2013, 11:54:49 AM »
Looking at these, it appears the T on Giovanna's coin may have suffered slight damage. The "notch" in the top is much more pronounced. In my opinion this makes it look a bit like a "Y" but not really like a "V", though I agree it must be a "T". What do you think?



Offline Figleaf

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2013, 12:03:54 PM »
I thought of damage, but rejected that because underneath, the surface is smooth. Compare the G in VNGA on the obverse of the second coin you posted, turned into a C by damage. While you are at it, note the legend variations.

These dies were hand cut and the coins are really small. It doesn't take much for the die cutter to cut the T just a little bit too deep.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Giovanna

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2013, 01:12:38 PM »
Do you think it could be a variant? Or in those years there have been several mintmasters maybe.
However it is a coin interesting and also beautiful.
Thanks to both of you.

Offline ChrisHagen

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2013, 01:55:03 PM »
Ah I see now the smoothness of the underlying surface.

I think that if it were a modern coin it would be a considered a variety with perhaps a premium, but as Peter notes with these tiny coins it is more the rule than the exception that there will be a couple minor errors by the die-cutter. I might consider it a little interesting, but these coins are intrinsically interesting to be to begin with so I am not really at a place to speak :D

Giovanna

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Re: Hungary, denar, 1527
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2013, 02:24:22 PM »
Hello, I understand thank you. The currency is already interesting normally, this small change also makes it more "intriguing" in my opinion.
Thank you again, Giò