Cityscapes

Started by Miner, August 08, 2013, 08:12:48 PM

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Miner

Topic to coin with a wide view of many buildings of different types.
Malaysia 1 Ringgit 2000. View Kuala Lumpur

<k>

#1
GDR 10M 1974.jpg

German Democratic Republic, 10 Mark, 1974.  25th anniversary of foundation. 



Various buildings from various GDR cities.

Apart from East Berlin (TV Tower), there are sites from Dresden, Erfurt, Karl-Marx-Stadt (Chemnitz's name at that time), Leipzig, Neubrandenburg and Potsdam.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

#2
Russia 2008 100 roubles~.jpg

Russia, 2008, 100 rubles.  Pereslavl-Zalessky
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

chrisild

This €100 gold coin from the Unesco Cultural Heritage series features ancient and medieval buildings in Trier. The place is (probably) the oldest city - as opposed to a village, camp etc. - in Germany ...

Christian

chrisild

In case you tour Eastern Germany some time in the near future, you can still see all these buildings. :) Even Karl Marx (roughly at five o'clock on the coin) is still there ...

Here is another piece from the World Heritage series. This coin shows Lübeck, with the Holstentor gate in front and the towers of the Old Town.

Christian

paisepagal

€10 Dresden



and yes...i did do a little tour of eastern Germany . My thougths in this link http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,16134.msg110788.html#msg110788

SquareEarth

#6
China 200 yuan Successful bid for Shanghai Expo 2002


China 150 yuan Holding Shanghai Expo 2010


There is a misconception that Shanghai is a "showcase city" built up by Chinese government to impress foreigners, but in reality the Municipality spent its first three decades of communist rule serving as the "milk cow" of central government, with 80% of the city's fiscal income taken away by the center.
Tong Bao_Tsuho_Tong Bo_Thong Bao

Figleaf

I think of Pudong as a "showcase", though. Especially after a number of Hong Kong style apartment buildings in Shenzen had to be destroyed or emptied due to shoddy construction.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Miner

Malaysia 1 Ringgit 2000. View Shah Alam

natko

This is one of my favorites, impressive details on 1839 tiny coin, especially the eagle. View of Frankfurt back in time.

Nowadays look from the opposite side at the same scene
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Frankfurt_Am_Main-Alte_Bruecke-Ansicht_von_der_Ignatz-Bubis-Bruecke.jpg

P.S. I was pretty sure this exact, uncut bridge is found on the (old) 10 euro banknotes, but buildings on the euros seem to be purely examples of the architecture, not actual monuments.

Figleaf

The bridge on the coin cannot be opened for shipping, that on the picture can. Frankfurt was heavily bombed in the second world war and bridges would have been a prime target, while churches would not be a target and have thick walls. All in all, it looks like you found the right spot, but it was heavily edited by history.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

natko

Big gold coin commemorating the Mediterranean Games in my hometown. Showing part of the waterfront promenade, locally the Riva.



It depicts st. Domnius cathedral behind the walls of Diocletian's palace (3rd ct.). Rightmost block is part of it, a keep actually, the next few buildings are very old residential multi-storey stone houses. Interestingly, one in the middle was pulled down in the early 1980s, due to collapse danger. Location was heavily bombed by the Allies in 1943., despite cultural importance.

Here's a wide angle view of Riva.



<k>

#12
GERMAN STATES. Regensburg ducat 1765-90.jpg

German States. Regensburg, 1 ducat. Issued from 1765 to 1790.

The reverse shows a view of the city.


When were such pictorial ducats first issued, and why? When did they go out of fashion?

Imager copyright Atlas Numismatics.
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

Figleaf

They are the direct descendants of the "Schauthalers" (link in German). They came about in the mid 16th century and can be compared to today's pseudo-coins. Like most of those, they carry an official denomination, look like coins and have none of the economic functions of money. They were predominantly offered by mining areas, who realised an agio on the metal that would have been a disagio if the metal were sold in bulk. The pretty pictures were meant to convince the gullible retail "investors" of those days that they could also realise a premium.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

<k>

I see. Commercial collector coins in those days. Who would have suspected it?
Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.