Author Topic: World transitional coinage  (Read 6320 times)

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Offline <k>

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2013, 06:31:35 PM »
I think we should expand our criteria slightly from one year, to capture other transitional coins.

I also think this topic would fit better in the Numismatics board. It could easily fit in either board, but I think it's quite a fundamental subject. It's not just about metals, or about mints orienting themselves to collectors with ephemeral variations or markings, it's something more fundamental, about how mints do signal transitions in general.
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Offline <k>

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2013, 06:38:57 PM »


Some wider examples can be seen in the Double Denominations topic.

A curious example was the New Zealand 10 cents being doubly denominated as "ONE SHILLING" from 1967 to 1969, during the first years of decimalisation - curious, because it was the only example. The 20 cents could have been additionally denominated as "TWO SHILLINGS" and the 5 cents as "SIX PENCE", but this didn't happen.

The Rhodesians, however, did doubly denominate all those equivalent denominations in 1964, as you can see here.
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Offline <k>

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2013, 06:45:27 PM »
Another example of transitional coinage is seen in the final two issues of the East Africa coinage, the 5 and 10 cents coins of 1964, which included the denomination in Swahili, for the first and only time. Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya, which had formerly used the coinage of (British) East Africa, a currency union, all became independent around this time, and the use of Swahili on Imperial coinage signalled the transition to independence.

See: British Empire: East Africa and Uganda Protectorates.







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Offline gxseries

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2013, 07:14:22 PM »
I have to disagree K. I do not see how this can fit under the definition of transitional year. Reason why I focused on this specifically is because for mints to release new design / variation / planchets within the same year is something that had to be planned and executed quickly as they could not afford to wait till the next year. Most so far has fit this pattern with the exception of UK's 2008 coinage which I'll have to look at.

The way I see it is that mints exist to make a profit and for them to prepare new dies, planchets, etc out of the blue is something that comes at an additional cost. Unless it is absolutely necesary, I struggle to understand why changes must be done within the same year instead of rolling over to the next year.

There are a fair number of such coins after I thought carefully as well as reading information provided by other users from other forums. A lot of world war coinage went through this process due to detoriating economy, change of rulers, inflation etc. Mexico is also another good example.

There are some well known transitional error coins as well. 1943 US copper cent is probably one of the most well known as well as the 1944 steel cent. Another probably less well known error is with the 1957 Soviet coinage where the new emblem should have 17 ribbons. Instead, the old version of 16 ribbons was actually used. Think you can classify it as a mule error as well. 1992 10 ruble with the old "CCCP" symbol was also accidently minted and released to the public. 

I'll be preparing a record of these interesting transitional coins and document it.

Offline <k>

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2013, 07:32:22 PM »
I have to disagree K. I do not see how this can fit under the definition of transitional year.

That's why I said I thought you should expand your criteria, as it's an interesting subject. Your topic title doesn't include the word "year". But if you want a topic split, just say the word. However, when I asked this earlier, you didn't respond.

I agree with you that these coins were not oriented to coin collectors, but that it goes deeper than that, which is why I also suggested your topic would be well suited to the Numismatics board.
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Offline dheer

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Re: World transitional coinage
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2013, 04:45:42 AM »

The way I see it is that mints exist to make a profit and for them to prepare new dies, planchets, etc out of the blue is something that comes at an additional cost. Unless it is absolutely necessary, I struggle to understand why changes must be done within the same year instead of rolling over to the next year.

Not sure I fully agree with cost. Typically definitives are minted over years, the working dies have the year put on them ... quite a few working dies are used in a year. So if the Mint is creating a new Master Die from scratch [its expensive and time consuming] ... however once you have a Master die, creating working dies it easy and putting a year is easier ... so from a cost point of view it does not make much difference on change of die / designs.

There is very little cost difference to run 2 batches of different design/metal ... the only cost over run is the planning & logistics required.
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