Unadopted crown designs for the Queen's Silver Jubilee 1977-78

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A-Guernsey.jpg

Guernsey. This design shows the capital, St. Peter Port and Castle Cornet.
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B-Saint Helena.jpg

Saint Helena.  Jonathan the tortoise, a local mascot, and the Governor's House.
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<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

Visit the website of The Royal Mint Museum.

See: The Royal Mint Museum.

<k>

The Royal Mint Advisory Committee reacted to these preliminary designs as follows.

ITEM 1. JUBILEE CROWN PIECES FOR THE COMMONWEALTH

The Committee examined sketches by Mr. William Gardner for a series of
Jubilee crown pieces to be issued by some of the smaller countries in the
Commonwealth. The sketches included a common obverse, featuring Mr. Arnold
Machin's portrait of The Queen, and reverse designs for Guernsey, Jersey,
St. Helena and Tristan da Cunha.

Members were critical of the inclusion of the words SILVER JUBILEE on the
proposed obverse. Mr. Porteous in particular felt strongly that the words were
more in keeping with a cheap souvenir than with a commemorative coin and suggested
that the use of the two dates 1952 and 1977 on the obverse might be a more
appropriate way of referring to the Jubilee. The Committee agreed that an
inscription such as QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND together with the dates 1952 and
1977 would be preferable.

The Committee was not enthusiastic about any of the reverse designs.
Mr. Gardner's "picture postcard" approach was not liked and it was generally
felt that the designs would be much improved if they were simplified and a
greater degree of formalisation introduced.

Castle Cornet was accepted as a suitable subject for the Guernsey crown,
though on the whole members were inclined to feel that an aerial view of the
castle might 'be more satisfactory. A local castle was also thought likely to
be preferable to the mace and arms on the Jersey crown. Garter expressed strong
reservations about the heraldic accuracy of the design and pointed out that the
mace is in no way peculiar to Jersey.

The design for St. Helena was considered too busy. Mr. Carter preferred
the tortoise to the Governor's House and Mr. Porteous wondered if the tortoise
might not be shown on its own. Generally the Committee agreed that the design
would be better if there were only one dominant feature. Mr. Gardner's long-
boat design for Tristan da Cunha was also criticised. Sir Hugh Casson thought
it might be improved by the inclusion of a sail and the removal of some of the
waves. An alternative design showing the Royal Yacht Britannia was preferred
by Sir John Betjeman and Sir Robin Mackworth-Young.

The proposed common border of crosses and lys was thought to be a very
interesting suggestion. It was felt, however, to be unsuitable for the type of
design intended for this particular series of crown pieces and the Committee
suggested that it should be reserved for use in the future with more heraldic
designs.

The Deputy Master undertook to circulate fresh designs, amended in the light
of the Committee's comments.
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<k>




The reverse design of the issued Guernsey crown.

It was designed by Bernard Sindall.
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<k>

St Helena 25 pence 1977.jpg


The reverse design of the issued crown for Saint Helena.

It was designed by Christopher Ironside.
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<k>

Tristan da Cunha 25 pence 1977.jpg


The reverse design of the issued crown for Tristan da Cunha.

It was designed by Christopher Ironside.
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<k>




The reverse design of the issued Jersey crown.

It depicted Mont Orgueil Castle and Gorey Harbour.

It was designed by Bernard Sindall.
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<k>

Jubilee crown 1977-common obverse.jpg


All these crowns were given a common obverse.

The legend did not include the words "SILVER JUBILEE".

That was in accordance with the wishes of the Royal Mint Advisory Committee.
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See: The Royal Mint Museum.