Author Topic: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint  (Read 5797 times)

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Offline mitresh

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Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« on: April 19, 2013, 08:39:35 AM »
Mughal Empire, Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar, Gold Mohur, 10.9g, Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint, AH 986, Dotted border type


Mughal Empire, Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar, Silver Rupee, 11.39g, Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint, AH 987, Dotted border type


Compressing the image to fit as per file size limitation has given the coin a blurry look especially noticable in the Rupee.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2013, 03:08:32 PM by mitresh »
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Offline Abhay

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2013, 09:54:13 AM »
Nice Coins.

Mine - from Agra Mint.

Abhay
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2013, 10:43:37 AM »
It can't have been very difficult to gild the silver coin and spend it for a gold one, unless the receiver could read the texts...

Peter
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Offline cmerc

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2013, 10:56:02 AM »
It can't have been very difficult to gild the silver coin and spend it for a gold one, unless the receiver could read the texts...

Peter
That would explain the ubiquitous test-marks on Mughal coins.  However, they are mostly found on silver, possibly because it was faster and convenient given the large volume of silver coins handled by shroffs (money changers) or merchants.   For gold, I believe the common practice was to rub it against a test touchstone or, alternatively, bite down on the coin.  Ye olde merchants/shroffs probably took the extra time to test mohurs!

Beautiful gold coins in this thread!

Btw, is it fair to say that these gold coins are the equivalent of modern-day cheques, drafts, etc., i.e., used as monetary instruments for larger trade transactions?
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Offline Abhay

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2013, 11:39:27 AM »
That would explain the ubiquitous test-marks on Mughal coins.  However, they are mostly found on silver, possibly because it was faster and convenient given the large volume of silver coins handled by shroffs (money changers) or merchants.  For gold, I believe the common practice was to rub it against a test touchstone or, alternatively, bite down on the coin.  Ye olde merchants/shroffs probably took the extra time to test mohurs!

Beautiful gold coins in this thread!

Btw, is it fair to say that these gold coins are the equivalent of modern-day cheques, drafts, etc., i.e., used as monetary instruments for larger trade transactions?

It is still in use by the old traditional jewelers.

Just see this thread:

http://www.worldofcoins.eu/forum/index.php/topic,13818.0.html

Abhay
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2013, 08:06:54 PM »
Btw, is it fair to say that these gold coins are the equivalent of modern-day cheques, drafts, etc., i.e., used as monetary instruments for larger trade transactions?

An interesting, but complicated question. Maybe it is better approached from the pov of the typical instrument for payment:
  • Copper coins: small, daily transactions, low wage payments (e.g. agriculture)
  • Silver coins: medium wage payments, luxury goods, wholesale merchandise, large farm animals
  • Gold coins: very high wage payments (e.g. high officials), prestige goods, diplomacy and bribes, foreign payments
  • Hundi: travel expenses, multiple delivery merchandise, domestic trade financing
This list refers to North India. Missing in the list are metal bars, because I don't know if they were used in India. Chances are that they were, because they were used in Persia, Russia and China. If so, they would be used for large to very large commercial transactions.

Peter
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Offline cmerc

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 03:19:21 AM »
An interesting, but complicated question. Maybe it is better approached from the pov of the typical instrument for payment:
  • Copper coins: small, daily transactions, low wage payments (e.g. agriculture)
  • Silver coins: medium wage payments, luxury goods, wholesale merchandise, large farm animals
  • Gold coins: very high wage payments (e.g. high officials), prestige goods, diplomacy and bribes, foreign payments
  • Hundi: travel expenses, multiple delivery merchandise, domestic trade financing
This list refers to North India. Missing in the list are metal bars, because I don't know if they were used in India. Chances are that they were, because they were used in Persia, Russia and China. If so, they would be used for large to very large commercial transactions.

That is a very well put classification, I like the "bribes" part!  Hundis are probably a better equivalent of the modern cheque/draft.  I seem to recall that the price of mohurs against silver rupees fluctuated, depending on the demand/supply in the market (can't remember where I read that, some old scanned book on google books...).  Does that sound right? 

From the description of the coin posted on this thread, it appears that the salary of soldiers was being transported at gold mohurs.  Soldiers would fall under the second bullet: paid by silver coins.  Presumably, would an army be accompanied by shroffs (money changers), who would charge a commision to convert gold to smaller silver change?
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Offline Figleaf

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2013, 09:28:06 AM »
At the time of the third Mysore war, soldiers were paid in copper, officers in silver, (French only?) commanders in gold. The gold coins would be small, but good quality Southern Indian coins. The pay was expressed in an amount per day, but actual payment was irregular. Sorry, no source. I am not near my library now. It is safe to assume that there was at least one money changer among the camp followers.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

akona20

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2013, 10:02:59 AM »
It would have been rather uunusual to py soldiers while they were in the field.

Given a foot soldiers wage ranged from 240 dams to perhaps 450 (40 to rupee) and the method of payment was from the top down (mansabdar system) the preence in the field of this much gold which is in reality not a huge amount given the size of armies the suggested use is for retainers for the leaders for run of the mill expenses or bribes.

Gold coins were in reality rare in normal process.

Offline bhattanav

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2013, 05:36:02 PM »
Mughal Empire, Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar, Gold Mohur, 10.9g, Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint, AH 986, Dotted border type



What is the market price for this coin in India and also globally?
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 05:38:34 PM by Bimat »

Offline bhattanav

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2013, 06:00:52 PM »
Can you please tell me the details of this coin and if possible the current market value?

Offline mitresh

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2013, 09:15:59 AM »
I will send you approximate indicative price via PM.
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Offline Manzikert

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2013, 10:26:57 AM »
I'm very sorry Bhattanav but I think your coin is a jeweller's copy: the inscription just doesn't look right. The script is not flowing enough, just too crude.

Alan

Offline asm

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2013, 01:26:51 PM »
I'm very sorry Bhattanav but I think your coin is a jeweller's copy: the inscription just doesn't look right. The script is not flowing enough, just too crude.

Alan

I agree........even the dotted border does not look correct.

Amit
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akona20

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Re: Akbar: Mohur and Rupee from Ahmedabad Dar-us-Sultanat Mint
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2013, 02:12:03 PM »
Given the comments please provide the size and weight.