Circulated coins

Started by Figleaf, August 14, 2008, 12:03:30 AM

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Figleaf

I am often amazed about he amounts people are appaently prepared to spend on modern coins in order to get them in BU or UNC. This coin, like many others in my collection, was found in circulation. I think it's EF, but it has edge bumps and scratches to prove that it was used. It served a purpose. It really circulated. In addition, it has a purposeful design and it was issued for a worthwhile event; the abolition of the slave trade. You wonder why there aren't more coins issued for this occasion, rather than the umpteenth "commemorative" for a region, town, ship or animal.

Total cost for this coin: € 0.00. A friend received it for a € 2.00 coin and passed it on to me.

Peter


An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

BC Numismatics

Peter,
  That's a very nice find to get in change.I think 2 Pounds is worth slightly more than 2 Euros.

You can always check here; http://www.xe.com/ucc .

There were 2 commemorative 2 Pound coins issued in 2007.The other one commemorates the Tercentenary of the Union of England & Scotland.I haven't got any British coins dated 2007 yet.My latest commemorative coin is the 2000 Public Libraries 50 Pence coin.I finally picked up a 1998 N.H.S. commemorative 50 Pence coin last week.

Aidan.

chrisild

I have that "abolition" coin too. Well, what did I pay? More than "face" (£2.00 is about €2.50) but then it was part of a mint set. Since I won't pick any of those up from circulation, buying or swapping is pretty much the only way to go ...

Guess the idea of having to have "unc" or better pieces stems from the idea that, the better preserved a coin is, the higher its value will be. Which is not wrong by itself, of course - but with modern mass pieces, so to say, even well preserved pieces won't fetch much when you try to sell them later.

Christian

Figleaf

Agreed with that thought on how buying modern commemoratives is not a good investment. dealers have a 100% markup and I've done KM prices long enough to know that they shift very little over time (in other words, the money invested is steadily losing purchasing power). Collecting is an investment in yourself.

One of the problems I have with the mint sets is that I can't fit them in albums. Therefore they get stacked up and I never look at them again. I have even made a spreadsheet of stuff that doesn't fit in albums, so I don't have to go through the pile if I'm looking for something. The albums are out every day though and I keep shifting cartons to get them in what I consider a logical order today (but not necessarily next month ;)) I wil recognize some of my coins between a hundred of the same type and date (thieves beware!)

I picked up many Brit commemoratives from circulation. One great trick I have discovered is to buy a day ticket for the London underground in the morning with the largest note the ticket machine can handle. It will spew out a wonderful amount of coins, mostly two and one pounds. It's rare that there are no commemoratives among them.

One used to get these coins either from circulation or by trading, preferably with people living in another country. The internet has made that easier, yet, it seems to happen less often. There is hardly any interest in the duplicates I have put on this site. Upgrading seems to be a forgotten art also.

Or am I an old geezer whining about he good old days that weren't so good when you take a closer look? OK, OK, you don't have to shout. I got it. I'll shut up now :-X ;D

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

tonyclayton

As I have mentioned in another thread, this coin has one feature that is unique so far - it is the only bimetallic two pounds with the value on the obverse.

Figleaf

Usually, it's the other way around. I have yet to receive my first US, Belgian or German commemorative from circulation. Dutch commemoratives don't circulate either, except for a few early 1 and 2-1/2 gulden pieces. I did pick up a few French and Swiss commemoratives from circulation a few decades ago. I don't suppose the Swiss bimetallic 10 Francs circulate. France also seems to have stopped circulating its commemoratives. In the '80's some were still circulating...

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

translateltd

Quote from: Figleaf on August 31, 2008, 10:46:03 PM
France also seems to have stopped circulating its commemoratives. In the '80's some were still circulating...

Peter

In France in 1987-88 I got almost a full run of the nickel-bronze 10F commemoratives from change.  Those were the days!

You could also apparently buy the silver 100F at face from the bank, though I never did as I didn't have much spare cash at the time.

Martin
NZ

BC Numismatics

Quote from: Figleaf on August 31, 2008, 10:46:03 PM
Usually, it's the other way around. I have yet to receive my first US, Belgian or German commemorative from circulation. Dutch commemoratives don't circulate either, except for a few early 1 and 2-1/2 gulden pieces. I did pick up a few French and Swiss commemoratives from circulation a few decades ago. I don't suppose the Swiss bimetallic 10 Francs circulate. France also seems to have stopped circulating its commemoratives. In the '80's some were still circulating...

Peter

Peter,
  There is a French commemorative coin that is in general circulation - the Treaty of Rome commemorative 2 Euros.

Martin,
  There was one French commemorative that was struck but never officially issued - the Montesquieu commemorative 10 Francs.

Aidan.

Figleaf

The silver 100's could be had from the Banque de France in Paris, which is open to the public and used to have a numismatic window that was strictly face value only. I got my last batch of silver 100's from a metal dealer in the rue Vivienne below face, though. While the 2 euro commemoratives circulate in theory, they are very difficult to find in practice. Since they came out, my son has seen exactly two copies.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

tonyclayton

When in France I always found the tri-metallic 20 franc coin very elusive.
I have a fairly extensive collection of French pre-euro coins, but always found many dates very elusive in change, particularly the 2 franc coins.

Perhaps I this should move to another area!

Galapagos

I didn't like David Gentleman's 2007 design. It was very plain and inelegant, and the design concept of the zero in 1807 also being a broken chain link was almost a bad joke - a banal visual pun. So, I broke it out of my BU set and spent it. Perhaps it's the very same one you ended up with. But then Gentleman's stamp designs have been very simplistic too, lacking in interesting or finer detail.

Yvonne Holton's two pound design of the same year (Tercentenary of the Act of Union) was much more attractive - so I kept this one, even though I call it the Microsoft coin because of its four jigsaw pieces.