Author Topic: Piedfort Coins  (Read 3665 times)

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Offline Bimat

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Piedfort Coins
« on: December 19, 2012, 03:47:23 PM »
Just remembered that Israel has issued several piedfort sets before. (Not sure if they still do so)..Any more examples where mints officially issue piedfort sets for collectors? (Split this topic if necessary) (UK has already been mentioned elsewhere).

Aditya
« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 04:01:06 PM by Bimat »
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Offline chrisild

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2012, 04:01:42 PM »
We can also add China and France (including countries such as Monaco), I think. But I do not actually collect piedfort pieces ...

Christian

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 04:06:27 PM »
I thought Australia would be a prime candidate... Alas it isn't ... India does fall under this category... Albeit as a one-off in 1981 - year of child Rs100 54gms...
US should be in there shouldnt it ?

Offline Bimat

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Piedfort Coins
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 04:18:10 PM »
Found few more countries which have issued piedfort coins: Australia (several), France, Canada (I'm not surprised ;D), Mali (probably a fantasy?), Hungary, China, Singapore, Cuba, Bulgaria, Somalia (must be a fantasy), Romania, New Zealand and Tanzania.

The list is quite huge. Exactly not what I had expected.. :o

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 09:00:42 PM »
Many countries have issued piedforts at double or triple thickness, simply because it was the traditional way to get a new design approved. Such pieces are very rare. Usually, they have a mintage of less than 10, mostly in museums.

The countries mentioned above have just tried to bank on the originals by making commercial varieties. Judging from the small number who have done so, the casual coin buyer, who knows barely anything about numismatics, didn't go for them. Original piedforts are a sub-species of patterns (the later ones are often proofs). I think commercial piedforts are closest to bloodless fantasies.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.

Offline dheer

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2012, 06:49:15 AM »
Piedfort is an international theme ... and there are quite a few collectors who collect such coins across countries ... that is one of the reason that the Indian 1981's got so expensive ;)
http://coinsofrepublicindia.blogspot.in
A guide on Republic India Coins & Currencies

Offline Bimat

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Piedfort Coins
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2012, 03:09:55 PM »
So piedfort coins are made intentionally? My thinking (long ago!) was that these are error coins which are struck with higher thickness/diameter (thus resulting in higher weight) so not intended for circulation or for collectors..Sad it's yet another trick to make money... :(

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline malawi

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2012, 04:51:31 PM »
sorry for the question ...
what is exactly " piedfort coin" ???

Offline Bimat

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Piedfort Coins
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2012, 04:53:25 PM »
Piedfort: French term for a coin struck with regular dies on double, sometimes triple thickness planchet. Piedforts are not meant for circulation. French: piéfort, German: Piedfort Dutch: piedfort.

More numismatic terms here.

Aditya
It is our choices...that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. -J. K. Rowling.

Offline cj_fam

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2013, 09:06:17 PM »
Does anyone know what was the mintage of Year of Child Piedfort coin of India?

Offline Oklahoman

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2018, 07:52:15 PM »
I have a crown from Samoa that is half the thickness of a standard world crown.  Is there a history of coins being produced in less than normal thickness like there is a history of pieforts? Would this scenario then make a standard crown of this design a piefort?  I recall an African franc I found that just had to be a piefort.  But it turned out to be the thickness that region wanted for its coin.  Interesting topic.

Offline Figleaf

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Re: Piedfort Coins
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2018, 10:59:54 AM »
It's probably best to weigh your coin and compare it with the weight given for it in Numista.

A thin coin occasionally happened at the time when plates for stamping out flans were cast and quality control was random and in batches. The most likely cause is that at the end of a batch of metal, there was just not enough metal for part or all of the last plate. This is highly unlikely to happen in modern coin production.

Another scenario is that the settings on the rolling machine were wrong. However, when there are rolling machines, technology is advanced enough to have quality control that picks out light coins.

Peter
An unidentified coin is a piece of metal. An identified coin is a piece of history.